Does Paris Matter More Than Beirut or Baghdad?

Our indignation appears to be selective. If you care about liberté, égalité, fraternité, then recognise what’s at stake

Published: 16th November 2015 05:53 AM  |   Last Updated: 16th November 2015 05:58 AM   |  A+A-

CHENNAI: Paris was the gift I gave myself when no one else would have me. It was an armistice of beauty I bought at a time of despair. I had wept my way through a month in England and a week in Berlin and arrived, fragile cargo, at the city of light. There, I breathed easily for a handful of days near the end of that summer. And then I would go back to India, and to much worse yet to come. But those few and blessed days became some of the most precious stones I’d bead onto the thread of  my life. I knew them by touch: a memory I felt for when I doubted my gifts, my deservingness or my capacity to love myself. They still shimmer.

This is what Paris is to many people – those who have set foot there, and those who know it in fantasy. On Saturday, I woke up to the news about the terror strikes. I saw the mourning on social media first before I saw the reason why.

“An attack on Paris is an attack on love,” someone wrote on Facebook. And indeed it is. Not just love in the romantic sense, but love in the sense of altruistic compassion, which is formalised in the ideology known as democracy.

S h a ra n ya.jpgSomething about the city stands for freedom – whether that is the freedom to kiss or the freedom to think. Paris is beautiful in ways both intangible and palpable. It stands for the idea that life can be beautiful, and then it shows you how. At a distance, the city is a muse. In attendance, it is living magic.

I took a room in Montmartre that overlooked a ficus-gilded wall. For four days, I wandered by the river, in the churches, to the museums. I saw a woman with a cobalt blue parrot in the Latin Quarter one day and outside my hotel the next. I clicked a love-lock into place.

In the  most charming sequence from those days soaked in the miraculous, I found myself crying with joy in the Tuileries one afternoon, unable to believe that I could feel anything other than pain for the first time in a long time, and when I left the gardens and crossed a bridge, a stranger stopped me and gave me a gold-plated ring. She said that it belonged to me. And so it does.

This is not entirely panegyric. My first day in Paris was spent in its outskirts, in its underbelly if you will, among refugees. That’s a story for another time. But I know that story too.

Does Paris matter more than Beirut or Baghdad? Does it matter more than Damascus or Maiduguri? Does it matter more than Muzaffarnagar? No.

I am sad about Paris not because of outraged sentiments, but because of pure sentimentality. I am angry, about other places near and far, every single day. None among us is omniscient, which is the simple reason why our indignation or concern appears to be selective. We learn later, and then we know better next time.

If you are upset about what happened in Paris because terrorism is terrible, then recognise fear-mongering under any name it appears by. If you aren’t particularly upset about what happened in Paris, but you care about liberté, égalité, fraternité, then recognise what is at stake. Everywhere.

Maybe the attacks on Paris hurt so much because the city is a civilisational catalyst, one in which those principles are already – and I use this word deliberately – enshrined.

 

(The Chennai-based author writes poetry, fiction and more)

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