IN PICTURES | Hyderabad's Qalai: The magic craft of 'fire polishing' vessels

Published: 03rd July 2018 04:47 PM  |   Last Updated: 03rd July 2018 07:36 PM  

Qalai , Charminar, Hyderabad
Qalai, the age-old polishing technique to make huge cauldrons and vessels shine gold-like, still exists in the old areas of Hyderabad. This sheen is achieved by applying tin foil with a thick pad of old cotton soaked in Nausadar (Ammonium Chloride) ash. The workers then move the foil within the vessel after it is heated on fire. These artisans of fire continue their work tirelessly in pockets of areas behind Charminar. (Photo | R Satish Babu/EPS)
VESSELPOLISH_EPS111
Qalai, the age-old polishing technique to make huge cauldrons and vessels shine gold-like, still exists in the old areas of Hyderabad. This sheen is achieved by applying tin foil with a thick pad of old cotton soaked in Nausadar (Ammonium Chloride) ash. The workers then move the foil within the vessel after it is heated on fire. These artisans of fire continue their work tirelessly in pockets of areas behind Charminar. (Photo | R Satish Babu/EPS)
VESSELPOLISH_EPS114
Qalai, the age-old polishing technique to make huge cauldrons and vessels shine gold-like, still exists in the old areas of Hyderabad. This sheen is achieved by applying tin foil with a thick pad of old cotton soaked in Nausadar (Ammonium Chloride) ash. The workers then move the foil within the vessel after it is heated on fire. These artisans of fire continue their work tirelessly in pockets of areas behind Charminar. (Photo | R Satish Babu/EPS)
VESSELPOLISH_EPS112
Qalai, the age-old polishing technique to make huge cauldrons and vessels shine gold-like, still exists in the old areas of Hyderabad. This sheen is achieved by applying tin foil with a thick pad of old cotton soaked in Nausadar (Ammonium Chloride) ash. The workers then move the foil within the vessel after it is heated on fire. These artisans of fire continue their work tirelessly in pockets of areas behind Charminar. (Photo | R Satish Babu/EPS)
VESSELPOLISH_EPS115
Qalai, the age-old polishing technique to make huge cauldrons and vessels shine gold-like, still exists in the old areas of Hyderabad. This sheen is achieved by applying tin foil with a thick pad of old cotton soaked in Nausadar (Ammonium Chloride) ash. The workers then move the foil within the vessel after it is heated on fire. These artisans of fire continue their work tirelessly in pockets of areas behind Charminar. (Photo | R Satish Babu/EPS)
VESSELPOLISH_EPS116
Qalai, the age-old polishing technique to make huge cauldrons and vessels shine gold-like, still exists in the old areas of Hyderabad. This sheen is achieved by applying tin foil with a thick pad of old cotton soaked in Nausadar (Ammonium Chloride) ash. The workers then move the foil within the vessel after it is heated on fire. These artisans of fire continue their work tirelessly in pockets of areas behind Charminar. (Photo | R Satish Babu/EPS)
VESSELPOLISH_EPS110
Qalai, the age-old polishing technique to make huge cauldrons and vessels shine gold-like, still exists in the old areas of Hyderabad. This sheen is achieved by applying tin foil with a thick pad of old cotton soaked in Nausadar (Ammonium Chloride) ash. The workers then move the foil within the vessel after it is heated on fire. These artisans of fire continue their work tirelessly in pockets of areas behind Charminar. (Photo | R Satish Babu/EPS)
VESSELPOLISH_EPS117
Qalai, the age-old polishing technique to make huge cauldrons and vessels shine gold-like, still exists in the old areas of Hyderabad. This sheen is achieved by applying tin foil with a thick pad of old cotton soaked in Nausadar (Ammonium Chloride) ash. The workers then move the foil within the vessel after it is heated on fire. These artisans of fire continue their work tirelessly in pockets of areas behind Charminar. (Photo | R Satish Babu/EPS)
VESSELPOLISH_EPS118
Qalai, the age-old polishing technique to make huge cauldrons and vessels shine gold-like, still exists in the old areas of Hyderabad. This sheen is achieved by applying tin foil with a thick pad of old cotton soaked in Nausadar (Ammonium Chloride) ash. The workers then move the foil within the vessel after it is heated on fire. These artisans of fire continue their work tirelessly in pockets of areas behind Charminar. (Photo | R Satish Babu/EPS)
VESSELPOLISH_EPS120
Qalai, the age-old polishing technique to make huge cauldrons and vessels shine gold-like, still exists in the old areas of Hyderabad. This sheen is achieved by applying tin foil with a thick pad of old cotton soaked in Nausadar (Ammonium Chloride) ash. The workers then move the foil within the vessel after it is heated on fire. These artisans of fire continue their work tirelessly in pockets of areas behind Charminar. (Photo | R Satish Babu/EPS)
VESSELPOLISH_EPS119
Qalai, the age-old polishing technique to make huge cauldrons and vessels shine gold-like, still exists in the old areas of Hyderabad. This sheen is achieved by applying tin foil with a thick pad of old cotton soaked in Nausadar (Ammonium Chloride) ash. The workers then move the foil within the vessel after it is heated on fire. These artisans of fire continue their work tirelessly in pockets of areas behind Charminar. (Photo | R Satish Babu/EPS)
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