We Really Don’t Need Changes All the Time - The New Indian Express

We Really Don’t Need Changes All the Time

Published: 02nd February 2014 06:00 AM

Last Updated: 02nd February 2014 10:53 AM

Jiro Dreams of Sushi, a sensational movie based on the life of 85-year-old Jiro Ono, the magical sushi legend of Japan, has given me much excitement in the last few months. In his 10-seater restaurant inside a Tokyo subway station called Sukiybashi Jiro, the greatest artist in a cook’s world regularly bent down to relive his dream of making the best sushi even after 70 years of untiring devotion to perfect a simple idea to its eternal best.

Absorbing the nectar of melting expressions and hard earned wisdom from the man himself, wondering how’s it possible to love one thing so passionately and practice daily, you learn much about Jiro’s accomplishments. He has been declared a treasure of Japan and his eatery awarded  three Michelin stars in spite of its humble appearance.

Jiro has proved a significant point to a frustrated youth in a pressure cooker generation; his unparalleled success on meditation of work and focus has confirmed the universal truth in simplicity and opportunities that spontaneously flow with it. Sushi lovers flock to this tiny place by reserving months in advance and spend a fortune to experience the miracle that’s delivered out of Jiro’s golden fingers.

A civilization that followed yearns for changes. It has capitulated to weakness for new things and succumbed to the habit of chasing uncertainties and seeking solutions. Roots have been forgotten and the pragmatic understanding of one’s own taste is sunk in swirling smoke of failed hopes.

Change is not natural any more, out of frustration and uncertainty we have learned to force gears to be new and different. People easily get fed up of their habits like beloved food, home, work, country etc. And run around for something new just to satisfy the feeling of being diverse. It’s not always self hunger but mostly following a frantic community around and we have now come to a point where changes don’t always bring unwavering happiness or we hardly know how to live without changes!

The art of work is considered to be the expression of distinctiveness that will bring out the unique flavour of every person, regrettably it cannot be conceivable in everything for most of us. In pursuit of exposé and eagerness to be the best, we hastily change compartments without realising it’s still the same person in us, may be its mindset that needs help to see the best in our given settings.

Flames of Jiro’s eyes shine from that small restaurant and give the world a hope as we see the extravaganza of misled habits of superfluous changes around us. It makes one feel sad and amused at the same time, shall we slow down and rethink what we are and what could make us simply ecstatic?

Some intriguing new stories may sound weird but some people could get interested. Andy Baxendale’s new recipe for fudge flavoured with garlic, bacon, meat and potatoes! Kieran and Natasha Morris on wedding day had a special pizza with their faces created out of toppings with ham, sweet corn and tomato puree to celebrate their big day. A survey apparently encourages red wine and dark chocolates to lower the risk of diabetes, only for women though!

Even today Jiro walks quietly along the busy streets every morning, on the same side of the road, catching the same train, sitting on the same seat and watch a world embracing multitasking to extremes and not being able to understand the sweetness of unchanged rhythm of a chosen profession. A hero like him makes a restaurant a lasting shelter to the needy like the giant banyan tree in the corner of the village centre, simple and humble yet unique to the core of anyone’s imagination.

Jiro has taught and inspired many people for decades, following his dream, discovering himself and making his own rules. You don’t need changes all the time but a little more of inner self and keep finding it deeper as you go along, he has confirmed it.

The author is a London-based restaurateur who owns the Rasa chain.

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