How heart attack, stroke affect income

The reduced ability to work and earn income in survivors of acute health events could be due to lasting reductions in functional status and quality of life.

Published: 07th January 2019 05:43 PM  |   Last Updated: 07th January 2019 05:43 PM   |  A+A-

heart attack

Image for representational purpose only

By IANS

TORONTO: People who have experienced a heart attack, stroke or cardiac arrest are significantly less likely to be working or have lower incomes on average than healthy people, finds a new study.

Cardiovascular disease and stroke are the most common causes of death worldwide where one-third of heart attacks, 25 per cent of strokes and 40 per cent of cardiac arrests occur in people of working age -- under 65.

ALSO READ | Kindness can help heart patients recover from emotional trauma

The reduced ability to work and earn income in survivors of acute health events could be due to lasting reductions in functional status and quality of life.

The findings showed that acute myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac arrest and stroke all resulted in the substantial loss in employment and earnings that persisted for at least three years after the events.

The loss in earnings was substantial, with reductions ranging from eight per cent to 31 per cent.

In addition, even if people were able to work, their incomes in the third year after the event were five to 20 per cent less than before.

These outcomes have consequences for patients, families, employers and governments, showed the results, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

"Unemployment and lost earning owing to common health events have broad societal relevance, with consequences for patients, families and governments, such as bankruptcy, worsening health and lost productivity," said Allan Garland, Professor at the University of Manitoba in Canada.

For the study, the team evaluated the effect of these conditions on the labour market and compared the outcomes of 19,129 participants aged 40 to 61 years who were working before their event with controls who had not experienced a stroke or cardiac event.

The study will help in developing interventions and policies to support people to return to work, although more research is needed, the team said.

Stay up to date on all the latest Health news with The New Indian Express App. Download now
(Get the news that matters from New Indian Express on WhatsApp. Click this link and hit 'Click to Subscribe'. Follow the instructions after that.)

Comments

Disclaimer : We respect your thoughts and views! But we need to be judicious while moderating your comments. All the comments will be moderated by the newindianexpress.com editorial. Abstain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks. Try to avoid outside hyperlinks inside the comment. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines.

The views expressed in comments published on newindianexpress.com are those of the comment writers alone. They do not represent the views or opinions of newindianexpress.com or its staff, nor do they represent the views or opinions of The New Indian Express Group, or any entity of, or affiliated with, The New Indian Express Group. newindianexpress.com reserves the right to take any or all comments down at any time.

flipboard facebook twitter whatsapp