Negative social media behaviour linked to depression

In a study of over 500 millennials who actively use Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and/or Snapchat, the team from Texas State University identified five key social media factors associated with MDD.

Published: 09th January 2019 02:40 PM  |   Last Updated: 09th January 2019 02:40 PM   |  A+A-

Social media

Image used for representational purpose only.

By IANS

NEW YORK: While scrolling through Facebook or Instagram, did you ever feel that everyone else is living their life better than you? Such social media behaviours are linked with major depressive disorder (MDD), said researchers.

In a study of over 500 millennials who actively use Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and/or Snapchat, the team from Texas State University identified five key social media factors associated with MDD.

ALSO READ | Scam alert! WhatsApp Gold is back, trying to fool you all over again

Individuals who were more likely to compare themselves to others better off than they were, those who indicated that they would be more bothered by being tagged in unflattering pictures and those less likely to post pictures of themselves along with other people were more likely to meet the criteria for MDD.

The study, reported in the Journal of Applied Biobehavioural Research, also found that participants following over 300 Twitter accounts were less likely to have MDD. Participating in negative social media behaviours is also associated with a higher likelihood of having MDD.

"While the study highlights social media behaviours that are associated with major depression, it is important to recognise that social media use can offer many positive benefits, including fostering social support," said Krista Howard, from the Texas State University.

"The key is for individuals to develop an awareness of how they currently use social media and to determine what changes could be made in their social media use to reduce the behaviours associated with psychological distress.

"Some changes could include reducing the time spent on social media, unfollowing individuals or groups that cause distress, or limiting online social comparisons," Howard said.

Stay up to date on all the latest Health news with The New Indian Express App. Download now
(Get the news that matters from New Indian Express on WhatsApp. Click this link and hit 'Click to Subscribe'. Follow the instructions after that.)

Comments

Disclaimer : We respect your thoughts and views! But we need to be judicious while moderating your comments. All the comments will be moderated by the newindianexpress.com editorial. Abstain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks. Try to avoid outside hyperlinks inside the comment. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines.

The views expressed in comments published on newindianexpress.com are those of the comment writers alone. They do not represent the views or opinions of newindianexpress.com or its staff, nor do they represent the views or opinions of The New Indian Express Group, or any entity of, or affiliated with, The New Indian Express Group. newindianexpress.com reserves the right to take any or all comments down at any time.

flipboard facebook twitter whatsapp