MMA Brain Injury Risk Higher Than Boxing: Study - The New Indian Express

MMA Brain Injury Risk Higher Than Boxing: Study

Published: 29th March 2014 12:31 PM

Last Updated: 29th March 2014 12:33 PM

About one-third of professional mixed martial arts matches end in knockout or technical knockout, indicating a higher incidence of brain trauma than boxing or other martial arts, according to a new study in the American Journal of Sports Medicine.

University of Toronto researchers examined records and videos from 844 Ultimate Fighting Championship bouts from 2006 to 2012 for the study published this month. They found that 108 matches, or nearly 13 percent, ended in knockouts. Another 179 matches, or 21 percent, ended in technical knockouts, usually after a combatant was hit in the head five to 10 times in the last 10 seconds before the fight was stopped.

"We're taking the premise with this that what you see on TV is one thing, but to kind of add scientific rigor to document it objectively," said Michael Hutchison, co-author and director of the concussion program at the university's MacIntosh Sports Medicine Clinic.

With the technical knockouts, or TKOs, they reviewed videos and found "an increasing number of repetitive strikes to the head" during the last 30 seconds of a match, he said.

Professional mixed martial arts includes elements of wrestling, judo, boxing and kickboxing inside an enclosure with fighters wearing small, fingerless gloves and no headgear.

Officials from UFC, the sport's major brand, seeking approval to stage bouts in New York have argued that mixed martial arts has evolved over 20 years with many safety regulations to protect fighters, including mandatory suspensions after concussions. They say it's safer than boxing, with no history of deaths or traumatic brain injuries sustained in the ring.

Lawrence Epstein, chief operating officer of UFC, called the Toronto study "somewhat flawed" and said a forthcoming study by researchers who have enrolled nearly 400 active and retired fighters will provide better insight.

"By partnering with the Cleveland Clinic, one of the world's leading medical research institutions, on advanced studies aimed at not only preventing long-term brain injuries, but also identifying those predisposed to them, the UFC demonstrates true commitment to the safety of all professional athletes," Epstein said.

Preliminary results from the Cleveland studies found athletes with higher exposure to head trauma — based on a formula including number of fights, years fighting and fights per year — were likelier to score lower on cognitive testing. Researchers conducting the free, ongoing assessments of fighters' brain health are examining factors like genetics, lifestyle or head trauma exposure and susceptibility to injury.

The Toronto researchers, who examined UFC matches, found the time from a knockout blow — often a punch to the jaw — until matches were stopped averaged 3.5 seconds, with losers on average getting hit 2.6 more times to the head. With TKOs, they found that in the last 30 seconds before a match was stopped, the loser was hit on average 18.5 times, 92 percent of those to the head.

Hutchison acknowledged that unlike the knockouts, which meet the criteria for brain concussions, they can't definitively identify the particular injury from a TKO. Professional rules say that happens when a referee stops a fight because one competitor can no longer defend himself. "We can accurately suggest ... this can't be good for their health," he said.

Citing data from other research, the study said the mixed martial arts head trauma rate also outpaces American football and hockey.

The researchers proposed introducing rules like in boxing where a fighter gets a 10-second count and is evaluated after a knockdown. They also proposed more training to help referees identify fighters who are defenseless or have lost consciousness so they can stop fights more quickly.

Most U.S. states have legalized and regulated professional mixed martial arts, although some are silent on the matter. New York is the only state that prohibits such fights and longstanding efforts to get it legalized recently stalled again.

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