Latest Information on Search for Malaysian Plane - The New Indian Express

Latest Information on Search for Malaysian Plane

Published: 17th March 2014 07:03 PM

Last Updated: 17th March 2014 07:09 PM

The unprecedented hunt for a Malaysia Airlines jet expanded northwest to Kazakhstan and south into the desolate reaches of the Indian Ocean after Malaysian authorities concluded the was deliberately diverted by someone with considerable flying experience. A summary of the latest information on the search for the and the investigation into what happened:

LAST COMMUNICATIONS

The Boeing 777's Aircraft and Communications Addressing and Reporting System, or ACARS, last transmitted at 1:07 a.m., about 40 minutes after takeoff. ACARS sends information about the jet's engines and other data to the airline. The transponder, which identifies the to commercial radar systems, was shut down about 15 minutes later.

The final, reassuring words from the cockpit — "All right, good night" — were believed to have been spoken by co-pilot Fariq Abdul Hamid, according to Malaysia Airlines CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya.

After its communications ceased, the turned west and crossed the Malay Peninsula. Military radar detected it moving along a known flight route until it was several hundred miles (kilometers) offshore.

Even disabled, ACARS emits hourly pulses that are recorded by a satellite, and Flight 370's last "ping" was sent at 8:11 a.m. The location of the could only be determined in a broad arc from the satellite, which places the jet as far north as Kazakhstan in Central Asia or far into the southern Indian Ocean. The at that point would have been near the limit of its on-board fuel supply.

THE GEOGRAPHY

Malaysia's government sent diplomatic cables to relevant countries to seek their help with the search and ask for any radar data that might help narrow the task. Twenty-six countries are involved in the search.

The northern search corridor includes countries with busy airspace that likely would have noticed an unidentified aircraft in their territory. China, India and Pakistan are among the nations that say they have seen no sign of the .

Australia is leading the search efforts in the southern Indian Ocean. It has sent two AP-3C Orion aircraft, one of which is searching north and west of the Cocos Islands. Two more search aircraft will be deployed by Tuesday.

The southern Indian Ocean is the world's third-deepest and one of the most remote stretches of water in the world, with little radar coverage. Experts say if the crashed there, finding the wreckage could take months or longer, if it is found at all. Establishing what happened with any degree of certainty will require evidence from cockpit voice recordings and the flight-data recorders, which are on board the .

THE SUSPICIONS

The investigation is focusing on the being deliberately diverted by the pilots or someone on board with considerable flying experience. Police seized a flight simulator from the pilot's home on Saturday and also searched the co-pilot's home. Investigators are checking backgrounds of all 227 passengers and 12 crew members, as well as the ground crew, to see if links to terrorists, personal problems or psychological issues could be factors. But authorities are being tight-lipped about what they've learned so far.

THE UNKNOWN

The whereabouts of the is only one question still unanswered. The investigators are also considering: If the two pilots were involved in the disappearance, were they working together or alone, or with one or more of the passengers or crew? Did they fly the under duress or of their own will? Did one or more of the passengers manage to break into the cockpit or use the threat of violence to gain entry and then seize the ? And what possible motive could there be for diverting the jet?

Also Read:

Search on for Malaysian Plane, Focus on Indian Ocean  

'Good Night': Haunting Final Contact From Missing Malaysian Jet  

Missing Malaysian Plane Co-pilot Planned to Marry Girlfriend  

Pilot Suicide a Taboo Topic in Past Crash Probes

After Missing Jet Saga, Changes Not Assured  

Families Face Worst Nightmare of Mid-air Ordeal on MH370

comments powered by Disqus

Disclaimer: We respect your thoughts and views! But we need to be judicious while moderating your comments. All the comments will be moderated by the NIE editorial. Abstain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks. Try to avoid outside hyperlinks inside the comment. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines.


Read More



follow us Mobile Site iPad News Hunt Android RSS Tumblr Linekin Pinterest Youtube Google Plus Twitter Facebook