Workshop on Alternative Uses in Medical Training

BANGALORE: “Faculty of medical education play a crucial role in deciding the outcome of learning, especially when animals are replaced with alternative means in physiology,” said Prof David De

Published: 17th January 2012 03:20 AM  |   Last Updated: 16th May 2012 06:16 PM   |  A+A-

BANGALORE: “Faculty of medical education play a crucial role in deciding the outcome of learning, especially when animals are replaced with alternative means in physiology,” said Prof David Dewhurst, professor of e-Learning, College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh on Monday.

He was speaking on ‘Computer With Mouse- New Experimental Animal for Learning’ at a workshop on Modernising Medical Training organized by People for Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).

“All over the world, there are ethical objections to the use of animals in medical training. We must under stand that there are good alternatives available,” said Prof Dewhurst.

He also demonstrated in-vitro and in-vivo simulations of Rat Blood Pressure and Lagendorff Heart.

“ We can determine the effect of a particular dosage of a drug when administered. The programme will simulate the corresponding reactions, thereby minimising the need to use animals,” he said.

In 2009, the Medical Council of India officially amended its Bachelor of Medicine to state that experimental work on animals can be demonstrated by Computer Aided Education.

To promote this, PETA is sponsoring workshops at Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education on January 17.

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