Bengaluru government considers reviving Hesaraghatta tank

ith the city staring at a possible water shortage, Bengaluru Development Minister K J George visited Hesaraghatta tank to explore alternative sources of water for the city.

Published: 03rd November 2016 03:38 AM  |   Last Updated: 03rd November 2016 03:38 AM   |  A+A-

Thirstya
By Express News Service

BENGALURU: With the city staring at a possible water shortage, Bengaluru Development Minister K J George visited Hesaraghatta tank to explore alternative sources of water for the city.

Through the Yettinahole project, BWSSB plans to revive the Hesaraghatta reservoir, once a prime source of water for Bengaluru. If revived, Hesaraghatta reservoir can hold 0.7 tmcft of water and 35 million litres can be supplied for drinking water purpose per day.

George said, “Plans are on to rejuvenate Hessaraghatta reservoir by bringing water to it from Yettinahole. The reservoir, built in 1881 to supply water to Bengaluru, became dry in 1998.”

However, he said it will take another two years to bring water from Yettinahole. “By the time water is brought to the reservoir, works related to desilting the reservoir and fencing the 1,224-acre land have to be taken up,” he added.

Another issue is the sewage generated from Hesaraghatta village, which is flowing towards Thippagondanahalli reservoir and polluting it.

“In order to prevent the pollution, an underground drainage project and a sewage treatment plant should be set up here. A DPR will be prepared to set up a treatment plant,” George added.

George also laid the foundation stone of a BWSSB project.

Bengaluru city was supplied water through wells and rain-fed tanks till 1895. In fact, water was first supplied to the city from the over 100-year-old Hessaraghatta tank (Chamarajendra reservoir) on the Arkavathi river, a tributary of Cauvery. The tank is 20 km from the city.

The city was first supplied with 36 million litres of water per day in 1896. However, the scene changed drastically in the last many years and Bengaluru became solely dependent on Cauvery river.

But the good news is that things can change for the better if technology is enhanced and the present water bodies are treated. Water experts say the lakes in and around the city can provide at least 300 million litres of water per day to meet the needs of the city.

Stay up to date on all the latest Bengaluru news with The New Indian Express App. Download now
(Get the news that matters from New Indian Express on WhatsApp. Click this link and hit 'Click to Subscribe'. Follow the instructions after that.)

Comments

Disclaimer : We respect your thoughts and views! But we need to be judicious while moderating your comments. All the comments will be moderated by the newindianexpress.com editorial. Abstain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks. Try to avoid outside hyperlinks inside the comment. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines.

The views expressed in comments published on newindianexpress.com are those of the comment writers alone. They do not represent the views or opinions of newindianexpress.com or its staff, nor do they represent the views or opinions of The New Indian Express Group, or any entity of, or affiliated with, The New Indian Express Group. newindianexpress.com reserves the right to take any or all comments down at any time.

flipboard facebook twitter whatsapp