Bengaluru’s nature lovers take a walk in lush Lalbagh

For Koel Singh, the workshop’s highlight was the silk cotton tree, which is one of the oldest trees at Lalbag and is about 238 years old.

Published: 30th September 2019 12:30 PM  |   Last Updated: 30th September 2019 12:30 PM   |  A+A-

The idea behind the walk, said Chanda, was to help people understand the value of trees and their history and origin.

The idea behind the walk, said Chanda, was to help people understand the value of trees and their history and origin.

Express News Service

BENGALURU: Nature lovers of the city were in for a real treat on Saturday, thanks to an ‘Urban Tree Walk’ held at Lalbagh Botanical Garden. The workshop was hosted by Kavya Chanda, founder of Green Venture, and was conducted by Echoes of Earth, which is one of the country’s greenest music festivals.

The idea behind the walk, said Chanda, was to help people understand the value of trees and their history and origin.

“This is even more important in Bengaluru, since the city’s tree population is diminishing and people don’t care. We need to understand and value our natural world,” she added.

Agreed Sandeep Kulkarni, a regular walker at Lalbagh, who decided to attend the workshop to know more
about the trees there. Vaishnavi Balusu too, said it was great to come to Lalbagh early in the morning. “I have come here before but never specifically looked at various plants and trees. The eucalyptus tree was a highlight for me because I had heard of it but never seen one,” she said.

For Koel Singh, the workshop’s highlight was the silk cotton tree, which is one of the oldest trees at Lalbag and is about 238 years old.

“That was stunning. And it was interesting to know that  tamarind trees are not from India but from Africa. We learnt about trees like Cannonbal, Tamarind, Mahaneem, Pride of Burma, Mahogany, Eucalyptus, Mango and Plumeria,” she said.

Rhea Ann Lopez was particularly thrilled about how much she got to learn at the event.

“My favourite bit was about the African tulip plant, which is beautiful, fixes the soil for other plants and helps maintain the water levels,” she said.

The thought was echoed by Kasturi Das, who said the workshop taught her about many species of aromatic, medicinal and ornamental plants. The appeal of the event, however, was due to its interactive nature.

She explained: “They wrapped the workshop with a quiz to summarise everything. It came to my surprise that they even gave us a Holy Basil sapling to take back home.”

Stay up to date on all the latest Bengaluru news with The New Indian Express App. Download now
(Get the news that matters from New Indian Express on WhatsApp. Click this link and hit 'Click to Subscribe'. Follow the instructions after that.)

Comments

Disclaimer : We respect your thoughts and views! But we need to be judicious while moderating your comments. All the comments will be moderated by the newindianexpress.com editorial. Abstain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks. Try to avoid outside hyperlinks inside the comment. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines.

The views expressed in comments published on newindianexpress.com are those of the comment writers alone. They do not represent the views or opinions of newindianexpress.com or its staff, nor do they represent the views or opinions of The New Indian Express Group, or any entity of, or affiliated with, The New Indian Express Group. newindianexpress.com reserves the right to take any or all comments down at any time.

flipboard facebook twitter whatsapp