Bengaluru: Two patients get new lease of life with robotic kidney transplants

The boy and the techie received live related kidney transplants with their aunt and father serving as donors, respectively.
Doctors address a press meet on robotic kidney transplants that were perfomerd at Fortis Hospital, in Bengaluru on Wednesday
Doctors address a press meet on robotic kidney transplants that were perfomerd at Fortis Hospital, in Bengaluru on WednesdayPhoto| Allen Egenuse J

BENGALURU: Through robotic kidney transplant surgeries, Fortis Hospital has successfully treated two patients with end-stage kidney disease, including an 11-year-old boy from Yemen.

The 11-year-old boy was battling Steroid Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome (SRNS), a kidney disorder, while the other patient, a 34-year-old software engineer, was diagnosed with solitary kidney, a condition wherein an individual has only one kidney instead of two. The boy and the techie received live related kidney transplants with their aunt and father serving as donors, respectively.

Ahmed from Yemen was admitted with stage five chronic kidney disease, characterised by protein in urine, low levels of protein in blood, high cholesterol and swelling. In SRNS, the kidneys continue leaking large amounts of protein into the urine despite steroid treatment. This steroid resistance can cause persistent or recurrent nephrotic syndrome, potentially progressing to chronic kidney disease over time.

Ahmed had suffered from SRNS since the age of four, which eventually led to end-stage kidney disease. Due to medical complications, his parents were unable to serve as donors. So, his aunt volunteered to donate her kidney. After a comprehensive evaluation, Ahmed underwent a robot-assisted laparoscopic live-related renal transplant surgery, a minimally invasive procedure.

Additionally, ureteral stenting or a double J stent was performed, involving the temporary placement of a thin, flexible plastic tube in the ureter to facilitate urine flow from the kidney to the bladder. Ahmed was discharged just five days after the surgery. In the other case, 34-year-old software engineer, Chetan from Bengaluru, had a history of hypertension and only one kidney. Over time, his kidney deteriorated, leading to end-stage kidney disease. Chetan’s 74-year-old father volunteered to donate his kidney, despite concerns related to his age. After undergoing two weeks of dialysis, Chetan underwent a robot-assisted laparoscopic live-related renal transplant surgery, followed by ureteral stenting.

Explaining the procedure and the significance of robot-aided surgery, Dr Mohan Keshavamurthy, Senior Director, Urology, Uro-Oncology, Uro-Gynaecology, Andrology, Transplant and Robotic Surgery, Fortis Hospitals, said, “In cases like those of Ahmed and Chetan, where precision and minimising risks are paramount, we opt for robotic surgery. This approach allows for smaller, more precise incisions, reducing trauma to surrounding tissues and facilitating faster recovery times, all of which are crucial in renal transplantation.”

Dr Keshavamurthy explained that robot-aided surgeries have enhanced visualisation and that ensures meticulous dissection and graft placement, particularly beneficial in cases with donors having unique medical histories. Moreover, the benefit of smaller incisions leads to minimal scarring and improved patient satisfaction, which ultimately revolutionises surgical techniques and enhances the overall patient experience.

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