Rising night temp leading to lesser sleep, finds study

Unfortunately, night-time temperatures have increased even more rapidly than daytime temperatures, eroding quality human sleep.
Image used for representational purpose only.
Image used for representational purpose only.

NEW DELHI: Night-time temperature rising above threshold level 25°C is leading to inadequate sleep among Indians, as per a new analysis. While Mumbai tops among the metros, the Eastern part of the country is the worst where sleeplessness is higher.

Higher night-time temperatures can cause physiological discomfort and impact human health by preventing body temperature from cooling off during the night, increasing mortality risks. Studies show that above the 25 °C tropical threshold, sleep quality deteriorates and makes it harder for people to recover from the heat of the day. The new analysis carried out by independent research organisations Climate Central and

Climate trends shows that between 2018 and 2023, climate change is leading to a rise in night-time warming, which is impacting sleep quality and human health in

Unfortunately, night-time temperatures have increased even more rapidly than daytime temperatures, eroding quality human sleep that can have a range of impacts such as impairing cognitive functioning, negatively affecting children’s brain development, and making workplace accidents more likely.

Among the metro cities, Mumbai has seen the highest changes in the night time temperatures, with the city experiencing an additional 65 days of warmer nights whereas Delhi added four warmer nights.

Moreover, the condition is getting worse in West Bengal and Assam. Cities like Jalpaiguri, Guwahati, Silchar, Dibrugarh and Siliguri experience between 80 and 86 additional days each year above the 25°C threshold.

Several cities across India saw between 15 and 50 additional days where the minimum temperatures exceeded 25°C due to the influence of climate change, including Jaipur, with an additional 19 hot nights attributable to climate change.

“The high-rise buildings and concrete setup in the cities do not let the excess heat escape during the night,” said Dr Roxy Mathew Koll, Climate Scientist, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune. “As the temperatures do not cool down, the heatwave continues into the night. Open green spaces and natural environments can help release the heat,” he added.

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