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‘Rangoli’ is derived from the Sanskrit word rang (colour) and aavalli (row), which means row of colours or creepers of colours. The purpose is to create form of art through the usage of colour

Published: 14th January 2012 01:16 AM  |   Last Updated: 16th May 2012 06:14 PM   |  A+A-

‘Rangoli’ is derived from the Sanskrit word rang (colour) and aavalli (row), which means row of colours or creepers of colours. The purpose is to create form of art through the usage of colours, and it is thought to bring good luck. It is a traditional folk art from India. The most common way of making a rangoli is to pinch the thumb and the forefinger and let the color freely run out from the gap. These are decorative designs drawn by woman on floors and outside their doors and houses during Hindu festivals. It is also regarded as a symbol of welcoming for Hindus.

In the ancient times the material used for rangoli was rice or dry flour, sindoor and haldi. Now chemical colours along with dry coal powder and flower petals are used. Some of the other materials used are beads, grains, pulses, colour pearls.

The main purpose of making rangoli is to welcome goddess Laxmi on diwali, and is also used as an art form for Sankranti. Rangoli is named differently in different Indian states. For example, in south India it is called Kolam, Madana is Rajasthan, Chowkpurna in Northern India, Alpana in Bengal, in Bihar it is called Aripana, and so on.

Rangoli is also used for special occasions like marriages, birth ceremonies and gatherings. There are many schools which oraganise Rangoli competitions on every eve of Sankranti.

Vaishnavi Gupta is a class IV at Manikya Montessories High School

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