STOCK MARKET BSE NSE

Tearing through the Curtain of Discrimination

The timing of the play ‘The Storm Within....Stories of Abuse’ could not have been more apt. Staged successively on February 4 and 5 at Lamakaan, the play marks a month and some to go before the International Women’s day.

Published: 06th February 2014 08:43 AM  |   Last Updated: 06th February 2014 08:43 AM   |  A+A-

The timing of the play ‘The Storm Within....Stories of Abuse’ could not have been more apt. Staged successively on February 4 and 5 at Lamakaan, the play marks a month and some to go before the International Women’s day.

A production by Torn Curtains, the serious play deals with issues of gender and domestic violence and is based on the work of two authors Umbereen Inayet and Mehreen Poonja titled ‘Meri Kahani’.

Revolving around five characters -- Annie, Jaswinder and her mother, Phool, Madhulekha and Fatima -- it highlighted through a combination of monologues and dialogue interactions the tribulations of being a woman in an abused environment..

While issues of domestic abuse have often been seen across multi-media platforms, from cinema to television to street plays, the angst of the transgender and lesbian is the more concerned focus of this play. Especially, as it blends well with the changing mood of the society about them of late and the rejection of the LGBT rights by the judiciary.

The stand-out performances of the play, running into more than 90 minutes, were that of Annie, the lesbian and Phool, the transgender. Nearly half of the play time was commanded by their riveting performances that brought out sensitive dimensions to their persona, which are often ignored, vilified or ridiculed by ‘normal’ people.

Like any minority group which faces the overbearing domination of the majority, the play highlighted the dilemmas and frustration of two ‘differently-oriented’ people as they endeavour to fit into the mainstream.

While domestic violence cannot be condoned because it is widely prevalent, somehow, the performances of the two artistes in the play Maaji aur Beti was a tad stereotyped and predictable with the mother coaxing the daughter to use a combination of tactics - charm, servility and guile - to stay put at her in-law’s and serve them. The story of a panicky Shanti, a Tamil housewife who cannot communicate in English and is caught with a violent husband in Canada, was another poignant tone to the play.

Indeed, true to its name, as the play progressed, it brought out a storm of mixed emotions, highlighting the many miles for Indian society to go before the destruction within our women’s lives subsides.

Stay up to date on all the latest Hyderabad news with The New Indian Express App. Download now

Comments

Disclaimer : We respect your thoughts and views! But we need to be judicious while moderating your comments. All the comments will be moderated by the newindianexpress.com editorial. Abstain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks. Try to avoid outside hyperlinks inside the comment. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines.

The views expressed in comments published on newindianexpress.com are those of the comment writers alone. They do not represent the views or opinions of newindianexpress.com or its staff, nor do they represent the views or opinions of The New Indian Express Group, or any entity of, or affiliated with, The New Indian Express Group. newindianexpress.com reserves the right to take any or all comments down at any time.

flipboard facebook twitter whatsapp