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A Brahmaputra odyssey

A cruise on the river from Guwahati to Jorhat aboard a luxury vessel offers insights into the rich culture, heritage and wildlife of Assam.

Published: 24th June 2017 10:00 PM  |   Last Updated: 24th June 2017 07:17 PM   |  A+A-

Image for representational purpose only.

Express News Service

As dawn cracks in at Kaziranga National Park in Assam, we slowly swish through the thick grassland with dewdrops still on their tips.

Sitting atop an elephant, our eyes are wide open to spot the one-horned rhino, for which this UNESCO World Heritage listed sanctuary is famous for. As mist rises, we spot a mother and baby rhino at a water hole. Our mahout takes us close to the beasts, who remain unmoved. Later, we see many more of them, Kaziranga being home to over 2,000 of these scarce species. We also see other animals—deer, water buffaloes, elephants, crocodiles and exhilarating avian kinds—but no tigers and leopards as the big cats shyly hide from us.

This exciting wildlife adventure is one of the highlights of our eight-day upstream cruising from Guwahati to Jorhat along the Brahmaputra River aboard luxury vessel M V Mahabaahu.

Originating in the Tibetan Himalayas, the 2,900-km Brahmaputra is the lifeline of Assam. For time immemorial, the waterway has nurtured the socio-economic and cultural life of millions of people living along its shores. Sailing along the river means knowing more about Assam, which boasts of unspoilt nature, rich history, lively culture, and friendly people of many ethnic backgrounds. The river cruise is ideal to dig into the treasure trove of this remote Northeastern state in a different way.

The 55m long, five-deck boat is like a mini luxury hotel featuring 23 well-furnished and air-conditioned cabins and other facilities from reception desk, lounge, library, bar, dining, a small swimming pool, spa facilities, deck with cardio equipment and weight training facilities, 24/7 tea and coffee station, massage room for Ayurvedic treatments, steam and sauna, jacuzzi, salon for hair spa and beauty therapies. The cruise is operated by Far Horizon Pvt Ltd.

The M V Mahabaahu’s crew is trained, certified and experienced as per international marine standards. Food is light and lean, served by an executive chef. The breakfast and lunch are buffets, with semi-seated and theme dinners. An onboard bakery serves up freshly baked breads and rolls.

As our voyage begins, a mystic landscape of lush green fields and sandy river beds, interwoven with shanty villages and towns, unfolds before me. At scheduled stops we meet locals who introduce us to their simple and humble lifestyle. Other than mobile phones, I hardly notice any other sign of modernity here. Economically handicapped, they haven’t lost touch with culture and traditions. This become evident when they perform dance rituals like the Bihu, Jhumur and Mukha Bhavana, where masked actors enact an epical episode.

At Assam’s Majuli, once the world’s largest river island, we witness a high-energy dance by a group of monks from the 15th century Neo-Vaishnavite cult.

Our spree at Sibasagar is filled with history. During medieval times, this tiny riverside settlement thrived as the capital of the Ahom kings, who were of Tibetan-Burman origin. They ruled for 600 years until Assam became part of the British Indian empire in 1826. A few monuments from their time still exist to attest their glory, most notable being the Rang Ghar, one of Asia’s oldest amphitheatres;  Talatal Ghar, an intriguing royal palace complex; and Shiva Deul, believed to be India’s tallest temple dedicated to Lord Shiva.

The beauty of this journey is the absence of ‘rush’ to do anything. In between day excursions, time on board is unhurriedly packed with activities from morning yoga practice, informative talks during the day, cooking demonstrations and bonfire sessions on uninhibited sandbars in the evenings to keep all of us physically and socially active. All of them are optional, leaving plenty of time to sit on the top deck and get absorbed in the beauty of the surrounding nature.

No odyssey in Assam is complete without a visit to a tea estate. So before catching the flight back home from Jorhat, we browse through a tea plantation, gain firsthand knowledge about how the green leaves are turned into the world’s most popular drink, buy a few packets of black tea, and leave Assam with everlasting memories of an amazing journey.

Floating along from Guwahati to Jorhat on the mighty river

Originating in the Tibetan Himalayas, the 2,900-km long Brahmaputra is the lifeline of Assam. For time immemorial, the waterway has nurtured the socio-economic and cultural life of  millions of people living along  its shores.

Sibasagar

During medieval times, this tiny riverside settlement thrived as the capital of the Ahom kings, who were of Tibetan-Burman origin. They ruled for 600 years until Assam became part of the British Indian empire in 1826.

Kaziranga Home to over

2,000 of the scarce one-horn rhinos and other animals—from deer, water buffaloes, |elephants, crocodiles, tigers and leopards, to exhilarating avian kinds.

Tea estate

At Jorhat, gain firsthand knowledge about how the green tea leaves are turned into the world’s most popular drink, buy few packets of black tea and leave Assam with everlasting memories of an amazing journey.

On deck

M V Mahabaahu operates from October to March. Bookings open now. Tarriff starts at Rs 43,000 and go up to Rs 2.45 lakh per person plus taxes, depending on the number of days and room quality. For more details, visit www.mahabaahucruiseindia.com



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