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Doctor without Borders: For this Ayurveda medic, service transcends geographical boundaries

From the Delhi slums of Bawana and Kirti Nagar to the dusty and remote interiors of Muzaffarnagar in Uttar Pradesh, this Chief Medical Officer from Delhi travels all over to extend medical help.

Published: 31st May 2020 05:00 AM  |   Last Updated: 30th May 2020 10:59 AM   |  A+A-

Dr Anand Kumar Eslavath

"It’s my roots that pull me back towards people and their hardships," says Dr Anand Kumar Eslavath.

This 35-year-old Ayurvedic doctor was born into a tribal family from Banjara hamlet in Miryalguda of interior Telangana. Presently in Delhi, geographical boundaries mean nothing to him.

From the Delhi slums of Bawana and Kirti Nagar to the dusty and remote interiors of Muzaffarnagar in Uttar Pradesh, this Chief Medical Officer from Delhi travels all over to extend medical help.

In fact, he has put together a network of doctor friends that has aided him in reaching out to as many as 15 states and conduct over 2,000 camps.

“Good healthcare can help half of India stand on its own feet and as a doctor, conducting medical camps and giving them advice and treatment is the most satisfying part of my job,” he says.

Post his official diagnosis duties, one often finds him counseling parents. His four-year-old NGO—Banjara Mahila—works for women, the girl child and their health and education.

“My mom Sujatha has had a strong influence on me. It is her vision that seeps through my NGO,” says Anand. He was recently conferred the National Banjara Ratna Award.

But there is more to this medicine man than just his practice. A firm believer in treating society alongside, he underwent a filmmaking course at the Asian Academy of Film Technology, Delhi, so that he can turn his ideas and thoughts into short films with a message.

“So far I have shot three short films: Praja Hakku about child labour and school dropouts, Anturanitanam about casteism and Chiru Tej Singh about a tribal shooting prodigy.”

Even as he state-trots dividing time between his wife Dr Poornima, also an Ayurvedic medical officer in Delhi, his two children Ayush and Anjana in Hyderabad, Anand is constantly thinking of the best way to bridge the medical divide.

A Good Samaritan to the core, chances are that when you approach him even for a normal conversation, he would immediately try to find out if you or anyone you know needs any kind of help.

“We need here-and-now help and also a systemic change. While my relief camps do the former, my health camps and my movies do the latter. Holistic treatment is my aim,” he rounds off.

A firm believer in treating society alongside, Anand underwent a filmmaking course so that he can turn his ideas and thoughts into short films

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