STOCK MARKET BSE NSE

Crop intensification system fetches better yield, says former UAS V-C

With climate change resulting in erratic monsoon leading to abnormal distribution of rainfall worldwide, the farming communities are now forced to use techniques that help them cope with the new conditions.

Published: 10th June 2013 11:13 AM  |   Last Updated: 10th June 2013 11:13 AM   |  A+A-

With climate change resulting in erratic monsoon leading to abnormal distribution of rainfall worldwide, the farming communities are now forced to use techniques that help them cope with the new conditions.

One such farming technique is the system of crop intensification (SCI), which is largely practiced in rice cultivation and involves effective management of farm resources such as land, seeds, water and labour, argues Dr M Mahadevappa, former vice-chancellor of University of Agricultural Sciences (UAS), Dharwad.

In his research paper presented at the ‘National Seed Seminar-2013’ here, Mahadevappa says that a comparative study in five major rice growing states — Chattisgarh, Uttarakhand, Punjab, Madhya Pradesh and Tripura — indicates that the average grain yield was 2,466 kg per acre from system of rice intensification (SRI) as against 1,724 kg per acre from conventional method.

The straw yield was estimated to be at 3,320 kg per acre under SRI against 2,960 kg per acre under conventional method, he said.

According to experts, the country could save around `200 crore per season just in seed production if SRI is adopted in 10 per cent of total rice cultivating areas in India, since it requires just five kg seed per hectare as against 25 kg in conventional method. According to Mahadev, in the SRI, water used for paddy cultivation can be reduced by 40 per cent by way of nurturing plant root potential and reducing plant populations, giving each plant more room to grow.

The method of cultivation, initially started in Madagascar, is now adopted in more than 40 countries.

According to his research report, under the SRI, the nursery period is just 10-12 days as against 25-30 days in conventional method and the crop matures 7-8 days earlier than normal, transplanted crop.

Mahadevappa also argues that the net income of farmers was high because of less seeds and higher yield.

However, SRI has its share of constraints too. Mahadevappa says it cannot be practiced in canal-irrigated and heavy rainfall areas lacking proper water control.



Comments

Disclaimer : We respect your thoughts and views! But we need to be judicious while moderating your comments. All the comments will be moderated by the newindianexpress.com editorial. Abstain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks. Try to avoid outside hyperlinks inside the comment. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines.

The views expressed in comments published on newindianexpress.com are those of the comment writers alone. They do not represent the views or opinions of newindianexpress.com or its staff, nor do they represent the views or opinions of The New Indian Express Group, or any entity of, or affiliated with, The New Indian Express Group. newindianexpress.com reserves the right to take any or all comments down at any time.

flipboard facebook twitter whatsapp