Disruptive tech in India will help secure boundaries

Disruptive technologies such as Machine Learning, blockchain, artificial intelligence, and the Internet of things are being widely adopted said Vice-President Jagdeep Dhankhar.
Vice President Jagdeep Dhankhar and his wife Sudesh Dhankhar sit in the cockpit of HANSA-NG at CSIR-NAL as Governor Thaawarchand Gehlot looks on.
Vice President Jagdeep Dhankhar and his wife Sudesh Dhankhar sit in the cockpit of HANSA-NG at CSIR-NAL as Governor Thaawarchand Gehlot looks on.(Photo | Nagaraja Gadekal, EPS)

BENGALURU: There are only a few countries in the world focusing on emerging technology, and India is focusing on disruptive technologies like no other nation has done. Our quantum computing system which will be of extreme awareness and use is already in place. The government has made allocations for the same. Other disruptive technologies such as Machine Learning, blockchain, artificial intelligence, internet of things and more are being widely adopted said Vice-President Jagdeep Dhankhar.

He was speaking at the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)- National Aerospace Limited (NAL) after laying the foundation stone of the Centre for Carbon Fiber and Prepregs (an indigenously developed technology) in Bengaluru. He also examined the flight of HANSA-NG (Next Generation), a two-seater, low-wing aircraft, with low noise emission that can be used by commercial pilots.

Addressing the officers at NAL, Dhankhar said, “The indigenous aircraft showcasing India’s ability to design and produce advanced aviation technology truly stands as a symbol of an Atmanirbhar Bharat.” He added that a country that was importing 100% of its defence equipment has today changed the tide and started exporting them, earning billions of dollars.

He also appreciated the ongoing work of the wind tunnel facility calling it an “engineering marvel, which looks simple but thrills the body when it starts working.” He touched upon how airspace can be used for training purposes, create a fleet of people interested in aviation and pilots, and evolve how we do transportation.

Speaking about the critical need for technological advancement, Dhankhar said it will help us secure boundaries. “Gone are the days of conventional warfare. Men in uniform today, know the changing dynamics of warfare. What will be our position, and how strong we will be, will be determined in laboratories like NAL. And the good thing is, our future is bright because you people are working with an intellect, and education, which is unrivalled in the world,” he said.

Encouraging the engineers he said that they are part of a ‘silent revolution’ as most of their work might not be in the public domain but it will be a huge contributor to making India developed by 2047.

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