Nationwide online sparrow survey to end

COIMBATORE: After the synchronised elephant census brought good news to wildlife enthusiasts, nature lovers would soon get to know the status of the vanishing common house sparrow. A two

Published: 27th May 2012 01:48 AM  |   Last Updated: 02nd June 2012 10:34 PM   |  A+A-

COIMBATORE: After the synchronised elephant census brought good news to wildlife enthusiasts, nature lovers would soon get to know the status of the vanishing common house sparrow.

A two-month online survey titled ‘Citizen Sparrow’, commissioned by the Bombay Natural History Society to document the current population and distribution of sparrows and compare the cute birds’ numbers with the past, is set to conclude by the month-end.

“Since the sparrows have intermingled seamlessly with the human population, the lack of sparrows in any place is of particular interest,” says Dr Raju Kasambe, project manager, Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS).  There is a need to understand the status of the commonest bird and a citizen science programme with mass participation can help collect information on a countrywide scale, he adds. The initiative is to seek information from the public and involve them in the survey.

On the importance of the online survey, Dr Suhel Quader, research fellow at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) says, “The survey would create a vast store of information that would be available to all across the country. It can be taken by anyone who knows anything about house sparrows for a wider range.”

The geographical location is of utmost importance here. This will help in comparing population changes of sparrows at different locales that will subsequently indicate any threat to the population in the said space,” says P Jeganathan, coordinator at the Conservation Education Programme of NCF Rainforest Research Station.

The public involvement approach has other important benefits as well, points out Dr Asad Rahmani, Director of the Bombay Natural History Society. ”

The survey is supported by organisations like Conservation India, Indian Bird Conservation Network, Madras Crocodile Bank Trust and Salim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History. Interested citizens can log on to http://www.citizensparrow.in and record their observations.

Stay up to date on all the latest Tamil Nadu news with The New Indian Express App. Download now
(Get the news that matters from New Indian Express on WhatsApp. Click this link and hit 'Click to Subscribe'. Follow the instructions after that.)

Comments

Disclaimer : We respect your thoughts and views! But we need to be judicious while moderating your comments. All the comments will be moderated by the newindianexpress.com editorial. Abstain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks. Try to avoid outside hyperlinks inside the comment. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines.

The views expressed in comments published on newindianexpress.com are those of the comment writers alone. They do not represent the views or opinions of newindianexpress.com or its staff, nor do they represent the views or opinions of The New Indian Express Group, or any entity of, or affiliated with, The New Indian Express Group. newindianexpress.com reserves the right to take any or all comments down at any time.

flipboard facebook twitter whatsapp