Forest department sources said over 50 personnel went deep inside the forest to check on the five-year-old animal for three days
Forest department sources said over 50 personnel went deep inside the forest to check on the five-year-old animal for three days(Representative image I Express)

Tiger injured by snare in TN's Anamalai Tiger Reserve to be tranquilised for treatment

A total of 80 cameras have been placed in 40 locations, including on Tamil Nadu-Kerala border to monitor the tiger.

COIMBATORE: Chief Wildlife Warden Srinivas R Reddy has issued an order to tranquilise and treat a tiger that was injured by a snare in the Tiruppur division of Anamalai Tiger Reserve (ATR). Three cages have been set up with live baits to trap the big cat.

Officials believe the animal is in the Amaravathy forest range, which is spread over 25 sq km, and occupies a big territory like other big cats. The terrain is a difficult one for personnel to venture into often to monitor animal presence. Also, it would disturb the animal.

A total of 80 cameras have been placed in 40 locations, including on Tamil Nadu-Kerala border to monitor the tiger. Forest department sources said over 50 personnel went deep inside the forest to check on the five-year-old animal for three days, along with veterinarians to tranquilise it but did not spot the animal yet.

“Over the last two weeks, we were checking the tiger once in five days. We understand the wound is healing. Except for camera traps, our staff did not see the animal directly. Field level staff analysed the animal scat and found out it had hunted a spotted deer. This is a healthy sign,” said a senior official of the ATR.

“We are waiting for the big cat to walk into the cages as goats have been placed inside to lure it. Once it is trapped, we will tranquilise it and start treatment. The animal is currently out of danger. However, we are taking precautionary measures,” the official said.

On June 4, TNIE published a report about the the tiger, which may have been caught in a snare placed by poachers for deer or wild boars. The wire had pierced the lower part of the tiger, which affected its mobility.

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