STOCK MARKET BSE NSE

Hyderabad-based CCMB to head study on sickle cell anaemia

Scientists at city-based Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology(CCMB) will be using genetic mapping and pre-marital counseling for those affected with Sickle Cell Anaemia (SCA)

Published: 23rd September 2017 02:25 AM  |   Last Updated: 23rd September 2017 11:03 AM   |  A+A-

By Express News Service

HYDERABAD: Scientists at city-based Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology(CCMB) will be using genetic mapping and pre-marital counseling for those affected with Sickle Cell Anaemia (SCA) to come up with genetics-based diagnosis and treatment methods. The programme is sanctioned by CSIR under the Mission Mode Project and executed by CCMB.The three-year programme costing Rs 55 crore will be headed by scientists at CCMB and five other CSIR labs. The programme is designed around a survey on genetic mapping of those with Sickle Cell Anaemia by Chhattisgarh government and Chhattisgarh Institute of Sickle Cell Anaemia. 


The study genetically mapped and isolated children within the age group of 3 to 15 years and found 6,000 affected by the disease and 1,50,000 carriers of the genetic disorder. The scientists will focus on this group and provide them with genetic testing to confirm the status of the disease. Those diagnosed with the disease or those who have been confirmed carriers of the faulty gene will be advised against “marrying those who are carriers of SCA gene”.

“If a couple who are both carriers of SCA are having a child, pre-natal diagnosis will help us determine if the unborn child is susceptible to SCA,” said chief scientist Giriraj Chandak who will head the programme. “For those who are unmarried, we will warn them against marrying a carrier if they are a carrier themselves. The birth of an affected child can thus be prevented,” he added.Chandak and his team hope the data collected in the course of the programme will help them understand why existing treatment for SCA work differently on different persons. The scientist feels caste and inbreeding within families have helped keep the disease prevalent even today. 



Comments

Disclaimer : We respect your thoughts and views! But we need to be judicious while moderating your comments. All the comments will be moderated by the newindianexpress.com editorial. Abstain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks. Try to avoid outside hyperlinks inside the comment. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines.

The views expressed in comments published on newindianexpress.com are those of the comment writers alone. They do not represent the views or opinions of newindianexpress.com or its staff, nor do they represent the views or opinions of The New Indian Express Group, or any entity of, or affiliated with, The New Indian Express Group. newindianexpress.com reserves the right to take any or all comments down at any time.

edexworks
flipboard facebook twitter whatsapp