41,000-year-old wildlife fossil found in Prakasam district in Andhra Pradesh

The excavation project aims to explore why wild animals, birds, and organisms weighing 40 kg or more became extinct in later years, what their lifestyles were like and where they lived.
Through Carbon Dating (C14) testing, it has been proven that the fossilised ostrich eggshell pieces were dated back to approximately 41,000 years.
Through Carbon Dating (C14) testing, it has been proven that the fossilised ostrich eggshell pieces were dated back to approximately 41,000 years. Photo | Express

ONGOLE : A team of professors and scholars from the Maharaja Sayajirao University (MS University) Baroda in Vadodara of Gujarat has launched a research project through its archaeological studies and research wing in Prakasam district.

In their recent excavations in the district, many prehistoric wildlife fossils were found. Through Carbon Dating (C14) testing, it has been proven that the fossilised ostrich eggshell pieces were dated back to approximately 41,000 years. Their excavation project aims to explore questions such as why wild animals, birds, and others organisms weighing 40 kg or more became extinct in later years, what their lifestyles were like and where they lived. Assistant Professor Dr D Anil Kumar, from Prakasam district, initiated this research with his team in the vicinity of the Manneru rivulet near Motravulapadu village in the Paamuru mandal of Prakasam district.

Dr Anil Kumar, who is well aware of the rich historical treasures of the district and its surrounding, applied for and received permission from the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) to conduct excavations in the area.

The ASI has also directed the Andhra Pradesh State Archaeological Department to monitor the process.

Upon the directives of AP State Archaeology Department Commissioner Vani Mohan, State Deputy Director Suresh, Assistant Director Venkata Rao and Nellore-Prakasam Assistant Director G Gangadhar, accompanied by Prof Anil Kumar and his team, visited the Manneru and Nasa Vagu areas. During their filed survey, they discovered three prehistoric ostrich egg-laying sites and collected more than 3,500 fossilised ostrich eggshell pieces.

Dr Anil Kumar and his team have been conducting explorations to collect numerous fossil evidences of wildlife and ancient human habitations dating back to the prehistoric period for the last three years (since 2021). They have until November 2024 to conclude their excavations and research. The research team has sent all their fossil collections to various renowned institutions, including universities in Germany and Oxford, for period testing using the Carbon Dating (C14) method.

“In earlier discoveries, the team found many fossils of prehistoric (Stone Age) animals, including cows, crocodiles, octopuses, and lizards, along with a large number of Stone Age weapons. We are going to submit a detailed report on these excavations to the ASI as well as to the government for further action,” explained Suresh, Deputy Director of the AP State Archaeology Department.

Related Stories

No stories found.

X
The New Indian Express
www.newindianexpress.com