Hyderabad ceases to be common capital today

In 2019, when the YSRC formed government, it proposed three capitals for decentralised administration.
Image used for representational purpose only.
Image used for representational purpose only.Photo | Sri Loganathan Velmurugan

VIJAYAWADA: Hyderabad will cease to be the common capital of Telangana and Andhra Pradesh from Sunday. As per the Andhra Pradesh Reorganisation Act, 2014, Hyderabad was to be the common capital of Telangana and Andhra Pradesh not exceeding 10 years. However, the Act was only of technical importance as Amaravati was declared the capital of the State in 2015.

The TDP, which came to power in 2014 soon after the bifurcation of Andhra Pradesh, decided to administer the residual State from the new capital, even as blueprints for its development were being prepared. For a brief period initially, Vijayawada was made the temporary seat of administration.

In 2019, when the YSRC formed government, it proposed three capitals for decentralised administration. However, the proposal was met with resistance and legal hurdles.

Now, the fate of the capital of Andhra Pradesh is hinged on the outcome of the Assembly elections on June 4.

If YSRC retains power in the State, it will go ahead with implementing the three-capital plan with Visakhapatnam as the executive capital, Amaravati as the legislative capital and Kurnool as the judicial capital. Confident of retaining power for a second term, Chief Minister YS Jagan Mohan Reddy has already announced that he will take oath in Visakhapatnam on June 9. On the other hand, if the TDP-JSP-BJP alliance emerge victors, Amaravati will be developed as the capital city.

Besides this, a proposal to retain Hyderabad for some more time has also been mooted. In the run-up to the elections, YSRC leader YV Subba Reddy had opined that it would be better to continue Hyderabad as the capital for some more time.

However, the YSRC stood by its proposal for decentralised administration with Visakhapatnam as the executive capital.

Irrespective of who wins, the government has a tough task ahead of it. If YSRC makes the cut, it will have to deal with the legal tangle that the three-capital proposal is embroiled in.

If TDP and its allies come to power, they will face huge financial challenges. While the development of Amaravati, a greenfield city, means an infusion of Rs 2.5 lakh crore to Rs 3 lakh crore, the cost to implement all promises made in the ‘Praja Manifesto’ has been pegged at Rs 2.5 lakh crore.

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