Kasaragod sarees to create a flutter

“We are planning to revive the traditional Kasaragod sarees. We will provide financial assistance to create better infrastructure and help with marketing activities," said District Collector Inbasekar K.
District Collector Inbasekar K visits the Kasaragod saree handloom mill
District Collector Inbasekar K visits the Kasaragod saree handloom millPhoto | Express

KASARAGOD: Kasaragod is gearing up to adorn a beauty spot on its own unique product- the Kasaragod saree. This handloom treasure, recognised with the prestigious Earth Index status, is set to be the centrepiece of a new marketing initiative by the district administration. The plan, crafted in collaboration with the tourism department and the National Institute of Fashion Technology, aims to not only promote the saree but also attract tourists to Kasaragod.

District Collector Inbasekar K said, “We are planning to revive the traditional Kasaragod sarees. We will provide financial assistance to create better infrastructure and help with marketing activities. The project will be executed as part of Kasaragod tourism. A detailed plan will be released soon.”

The Kasaragod saree is a traditional cotton saree crafted only by weavers of Kasaragod district. They are handmade, exceptionally durable and showcase the Karavali style influence, which is different from the traditional Kerala saree.

The Kasaragod saree weaving tradition traces its origins to the 18th century. Kasaragod joins the ranks of Kerala’s four celebrated handloom weaving traditions, alongside Balaramapuram, Kuthampully, and Chendamangalam.

“The revival plan for the Kasaragod saree is in discussion. Many people in Kasaragod don’t know about Kasaragod sarees. We aim to promote the sarees so that everyone gets to know about them. Our plan is to popularise sarees so that tourists who visit Kasaragod can take them as souvenirs,” Lijo Joseph, secretary of the District Tourism Promotion Council, said.

Carrying the torch of tradition since 1938, the Kasaragod Weavers Cooperative Production and Sale Society Ltd. champions the art of weaving Kasaragod sarees. They not only produce and sell these beautiful textiles but also train future generations of weavers. While the cooperative once employed a robust workforce of 600, the number has since dipped to 35, reflecting a concern that the number of skilled weavers is declining. Notably, women weavers make up a commendable 25 out of the remaining 35.

An employee of Kasaragod Weavers Cooperative Production and Sale Society Ltd said, “The issue of new people not entering into these fields is affecting the industry.”

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