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Kakatiya-era Ekaveera Devi temple in Warangal cries for attention

The State government should respond immediately and undertake restorations to preserve the heritage monument, said archaeologist Aravind Pakide.

Published: 11th January 2021 08:19 AM  |   Last Updated: 11th January 2021 08:19 AM   |  A+A-

Wild vegetation sprouts from various parts of the 900-year-old Ekaveera Devi temple at Mogilicherla village in Geesugonda mandal, Warangal district.

Wild vegetation sprouts from various parts of the 900-year-old Ekaveera Devi temple at Mogilicherla village in Geesugonda mandal, Warangal district.

Express News Service

WARANGAL: A historically important temple at Mogilicherla village in Geesugonda mandal where the rulers of kingdoms and dynasties offered prayers for over many centuries is now being used to accommodate cattle and has been turned into a makeshift toilet by the villagers. 

The fate of over 900-year-old Ekaveera Devi temple is hanging by a thread. The temple was built during 1156-1196 BC and it was greatly revered.  Having faced nature’s vagaries for centuries, it is on the brink of collapse and is in immediate need of restoration. 

Though the Telangana State Tourism Development Corporation had announced two years ago that they would restore the temple at an estimated cost of `40 lakh, no works have been taken up to date. The temple, which is protected by the Archaeology Department, is in a dilapidated condition. The granite stones of the temple are regularly being stolen. 

The Ekaveera temple was built during the Kakatiya period.  Ekaveera was a popular Goddess of the Kakatiyan period. Queen Rudramadevi used to visit the temple frequently for offering special prayers to the Ekaveera deity. This particular temple also finds a mention in ancient scriptures like the ‘Siddeshwara Charitra’ written by Kase Sarvappa and ‘Kreedabhiram’ written by Vinukonda Vallabha Rayudu. Villagers call this temple as Ellamma temple.

The temple has entrances on the north, east, and southern sides while a ‘garbhagriha’ (sanctum sanctorum) is located on the western side. There are eight big pillars — four in the centre, two in front of the garbhagriha and two inside it. Twenty short pillars are on the eastern side. The entire temple was reportedly built on bedrock.

Though locals came forward to save the temple and placed mud bags to support the damaged pillars, the soil inside the bags got washed away in the recent rains. Many tombs are being constructed just beside the temple. In addition, the area around the temple has been encroached by locals and there is no easy access for visitors. Locals say during the night, anti-social elements are entering the temple. 

The State government should respond immediately and undertake restorations to preserve the heritage monument, said archaeologist Aravind Pakide.



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