Bangalore shows the way in recycling

The IT hub of Bangalore generates more than a thousand tonne of electronic and electric waste every month. But till date, only two recycling units, one in Dobbespet and the other in Kumbalgod have come up in the city.

Published: 04th July 2012 08:19 AM  |   Last Updated: 04th July 2012 08:27 AM   |  A+A-

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The IT hub of Bangalore generates more than a thousand tonne of electronic and electric waste every month, but how it dispose off and recycle it is a big question mark. The mounting e-waste and absence of  proper scientific disposal has necessitated the introduction of new regulations and the need for setting up of e-waste recycling units.

Till date, only two recycling units, one in Dobbespet and the other in Kumbalgod have come up in the city while rest of the sanctioned  units are still on paper.

With the E-wastes (handling and management) Rules, 2011 coming into effect from May this year, it becomes very necessary to address this complicated issue and make the producers and bulk consumers more responsible.

Till now, discarded items like television sets, refrigerators, washing machines, air-conditioners, telephones, mobile phones, computers, laptops, printers, and other IT and telecommunication equipment used to find their way to the scrap dealers and finally to the landfills in the aftermath of its dismantling in the most unscientific way. But now with the introduction of the new regulations, more people and corporates have to come forward to tackle the recycling issue that involves handling of hazardous chemicals.

In this regard, one such company, Cerebra who has been till now handling collection, dismantling and refurbishing of e-wastes has proposed to set up one of India’s largest recycling plant at Narsapur near Bangalore with the company planning to make it fully operational by March, next year.

What are recycling products ?

How many of us are aware what goes into the making of an electronic or an electrical equipment like mobile phone or a computer ? And, after the product has served its purpose, it is considered dead, ready for dismantling and recycling. If these metals can be extracted and recycled, we can address the problem of scarce raw materials, tackle indiscriminate mining and meet the demand for electronic and electrical products. “Why do the mining when it is readily available on the surface of the earth in the form of E-waste and that can meet the ever growing needs of the E & E industry,” says an expert.

For example, a mobile phone is made up of these rare earth and precious metals

* 250 milligrams of Silver

* 24 milligrams of Gold

* 9 milligrams of Palladium

* 9 grams of copper

* 3.8 milligrams of Cobalt

While, a Laptop is made up of :

* 1000 mg of Silver

* 220 mg of Gold

* 500 grams of Copper

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