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In the early 1900s, teenaged Sunja, the adored daughter of a crippled fisherman, falls for a wealthy stranger at the seashore near her home in Korea.

Published: 02nd January 2018 10:48 PM  |   Last Updated: 03rd January 2018 08:05 AM   |  A+A-

By Express News Service

Pachinko
By Min Jin Lee
Pages: 512
In the early 1900s, teenaged Sunja, the adored daughter of a crippled fisherman, falls for a wealthy stranger at the seashore near her home in Korea. He promises her the world, but when she discovers she is pregnant—and that her lover is married—she refuses to be bought. Instead, she accepts an offer of marriage from a gentle, sickly minister passing through on his way to Japan. But her decision to abandon her home, and to reject her son’s powerful father, sets off a dramatic saga that will echo down through the generations. Pachinko is a story of love, sacrifice, ambition, and loyalty. From street markets to the halls of Japan’s finest universities to the pachinko parlors of the criminal underworld, Lee’s  characters—strong, stubborn women, devoted sisters and sons, fathers shaken by crisis—survive and thrive against the indifferent arc of history.

Every Breath You Take
By Mary Higgins Clark, Alafair Burke
Pages: 304

Laurie Moran’s professional life is a success—her television show Under Suspicion is a hit, both in the ratings and its record of solving cold cases. But her romantic break from former host Alex Buckley has left her with on-air talent she can’t stand—Ryan Nichols—and a sense of loneliness. Now Ryan has suggested a new case. Three years ago, Virginia Wakeling, a member of the Board of Trustees of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and one of the museum’s most generous donors, was found in the snow, after being thrown from the museum’s roof on the night of its celebrated fundraiser, the Met Gala. The leading suspect then and now is her much younger boyfriend and personal trainer, Ivan Gray, who trendy, successful gym called Punch which happens to be the gym Ryan frequents.

The Heartfulness Way: Heart-Based Meditations for Spiritual Transformation
by Kamlesh D. Patel, Joshua Pollock
Is it possible for one planet to orbit so many suns? We have many centres in our lives, yet where is the true centre, the deepest centre that lies at the core of every heart? Ensconced in India’s ageless oral tradition, Kamlesh D. Patel—widely known as Daaji, the fourth guru in the Heartfulness lineage—traces a seeker’s journey as he examines the nature of spiritual search. Through a series of conversations between a teacher and a student, Daaji reveals the core principles of the Heartfulness practice and philosophy to Joshua Pollock, a Heartfulness practitioner and trainer. From reflecting on the essence of prayer and yogic transmission to demystifying the act of meditation through practical tips, this book will enable us to live beyond the filters of our sensory limitations and discover unity within ourselves.

End Game
by David Baldacci
Pages: 416

Will Robie and Jessica Reel are two of the most lethal people alive. They’re the ones the government calls in when the utmost secrecy is required to take out those who plot violence and mass destruction against the United States. And through every mission, one man has always had their backs: their handler, code-named Blue Man. But now, Blue Man is missing. Last seen in rural Colorado, Blue Man had taken a rare vacation to go fly fishing in his hometown. With no communications since, the team can’t help but fear the worst. Sent to investigate, Robie and Reel arrive in the small town of Grand to discover that it has its own share of problems. A stagnant local economy and a woefully understaffed police force have made this small community a magnet for crime, drugs, and a growing number of militant fringe groups.

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