Farmers dread monsoon in Karnataka's Sakleshpur

Ramesh N is a farmer from Maranahalli, in Sakleshpur. Some years back, he made good money by selling a portion of his lands for the Yettinahole water diversion project.

Published: 01st July 2019 04:58 AM  |   Last Updated: 01st July 2019 05:04 AM   |  A+A-

Great heaps of mud, extracted for Yettinahole water diversion project, now form the boundary of Ramesh's field on the slopes of his coffee plantation.

Great heaps of mud, extracted for Yettinahole water diversion project, now form the boundary of Ramesh's field on the slopes of his coffee plantation.

Express News Service

SAKLESHPUR: Ramesh N is a farmer from Maranahalli, in Sakleshpur. Some years back, he made good money by selling a portion of his lands for the Yettinahole water diversion project. But now he is having second thoughts as his remaining fields are under threat. 

Great heaps of mud, extracted for the project, now form the boundary of his field on the slopes of his coffee plantation.

The villages that fall under the mega project site mostly grow paddy, coffee and pepper. Many of the farmers here complain about the mud accumulating closer to their fields and near streams, which they believe will turn harmful for them during the rains. 

“One good spell of rain and the mud will enter the streams. These small rivulets have been feeding water to our land for many years. While the project developers have created new roads for our villages and we are thankful, we are equally worried that the loosening of mud at many places for the project could pose a danger during monsoon,” Ramesh says apprehensively. 

It’s not just Ramesh, even environmentalists fear the same as the excavation of mud for the project could also pose the risk of landslides besides the other danger of streams being overwhelmed with silt.

ALSO READ: Yettinahole stream diversion project - Where’s the water?

With research pointing out the possibility of the project not being able to deliver the promised amounts of water, activists fear that the Yettinahole project might create more harm than good. 

“The catchment area of Yettinahole river has been weakened further by rampant laying of pipelines and the construction of a dam. The project promises drinking water to Kolar and Chikkaballapur, but what of the people living in Dakshina Kannada, who depend on these streams for sustenance,” questioned Dinesh

Holla, an environmentalist from Mangaluru. Another fear is that the Government, faced with a shortage of water from the Yettinahole project, would start to look beyond this tributary of the Netravati river. “A 69-kilometre long area of the catchment of Kempu Hole or Yettinahole is now under threat because of the project construction. The developers have laid new roads near Bisle, away from the project site. This has made us unsure of the intentions of the government. We don’t know if the government is also eyeing another tributary, the Kumaradhara,” he said. 

The Netravati is fed by tributaries, including the Bandaji, Mrityunjaya, Aniyuru, Sunala, Kapila, Kumaradhara and Ettinahole. Currently, the project scope involves tributaries of the Ettinahole which has been seeing a steady reduction in water with every passing year. 

Stay up to date on all the latest Karnataka news with The New Indian Express App. Download now
(Get the news that matters from New Indian Express on WhatsApp. Click this link and hit 'Click to Subscribe'. Follow the instructions after that.)

Comments

Disclaimer : We respect your thoughts and views! But we need to be judicious while moderating your comments. All the comments will be moderated by the newindianexpress.com editorial. Abstain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks. Try to avoid outside hyperlinks inside the comment. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines.

The views expressed in comments published on newindianexpress.com are those of the comment writers alone. They do not represent the views or opinions of newindianexpress.com or its staff, nor do they represent the views or opinions of The New Indian Express Group, or any entity of, or affiliated with, The New Indian Express Group. newindianexpress.com reserves the right to take any or all comments down at any time.

flipboard facebook twitter whatsapp