Pakistan records hottest April day ever: World Meteorological Organisation

A weather station in the city of Nawabshah registered 50.2 degrees Celsius on Monday; or 122.4 degrees Fahrenheit.

Published: 05th May 2018 02:37 PM  |   Last Updated: 05th May 2018 02:37 PM   |  A+A-

Thermometer

Image used for representational purpose.

By UNI

UNITED NATIONS: Deadly storms in India and record temperatures in Pakistan are an indication that more extreme weather events are happening globally owing to climate change, United Nations weather experts has said.

Amid flash-floods in the East and Horn of Africa - and sand and dust storms in the Arabian Gulf - Clare Nullis from the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) told journalists at UN headquarters in Geneva on Friday that this week's storms in northern India had reportedly left more than 100 dead.

What may well be the hottest temperature ever recorded for April, was registered this week in Pakistan, she added.

A weather station in the city of Nawabshah registered 50.2 degrees Celsius on Monday; or 122.4 degrees Fahrenheit.

"This is April - not June and July - this is April," she exclaimed.

"We don't normally see temperatures above 50 degrees: in fact, as we're aware, we've never seen a temperature above 50 degrees C in April."

Moving considerably further south, to another climatic region of the world, A WMO committee of experts also announced on Thursday that a record high temperature recorded for the Antarctic which was set back in in March 2015, still stands.

The record high reading, was under threat of being surpassed by a temperature recorded at a nearby weather station, in the same period of warm weather, and in more or less the same location.

The existing record of 17.5 degrees Celsius was recorded at the Argentine Research Base Esperanza, near the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, on 23 March.

The rival reading which, if verified, would have set a new record, was registered a day earlier in the same area, at an automatic weather station established by the Czech Republic on Davies Dome.

But polar meteorology experts examined the data closely and made their long-awaited announcement on Friday that the existing record still stands.

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