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Bringing back heritage art forms

Celebrating the diversity of Indian folk art, Vasantha Art Gallery has come up with a selection of Indian folk art which include refined Tanjores and Pichwais by artist Suvigya Sharma.

Published: 19th February 2020 06:46 AM  |   Last Updated: 19th February 2020 06:46 AM   |  A+A-

Pic: Saptarishi Mukherjee

Express News Service

BENGALURU: Celebrating the diversity of Indian folk art, Vasantha Art Gallery has come up with a selection of Indian folk art which include refined Tanjores and Pichwais by artist Suvigya Sharma. The collection also comprises Kalighat paintings by artist-duo Rup Sona and Suman. Based in a remote village near Kolkata, this artist couple belongs to a cluster of Kalighat artists that have been struggling to create a sustainable income. 

“Depicting mostly Indian Gods and Goddesses, the art is characterised by strokes, brushwork, simple and bold drawings, giving a sense of nostalgia. Using natural colours from turmeric, plant, fruit extracts and painted on old fabric or paper, the process is elaborate,” says Rup Sona. Curated by Art & Beyond, the event also highlights the lesser known artists of Indian folk art. “Modern day depiction of Tanjore’s made on handmade canvases, painted with vegetable dyes and exquisitely gilded in 24 carat gold.

These works are famously known as ‘Bardashat ka Kaam’ which means ‘Art of Tolerance’ as the technique involves the artist to paint under a magnifying glass,” says Sharma, whois also a master of Pichwai artform –  a style of painting which originated 400 years ago in Rajasthan and illustrates classical Indian poetry, literature and myths hand painted on silk, muslin or paper.

“Various pigments like metallic, organic, minerals and synthesised minerals are used in the painting process. The base material or Bhumibhand is pasted on a plain surface and burnished for even-ness. The next step is line drawing or Rekha Karma which involves sketching the composition using either black ink - syahi or red lac - alta,” Sharma says. 

Adding that the colours are filled in by a process called Ranga Karma and shaded – vartana using various dry and wet techniques.“The last step is painting a border or Hashiye and creating a Pichwai can take several months and requires immense skill.”The exhibition is on till March 14.



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