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Prices of vegetables hit the ceiling in Bengaluru

Small eateries and restaurants that source their vegetables from local markets are facing the brunt of high prices and incurring a loss of 10-15 per cent on a regular basis. 

BENGALURU: Not just onions, even the price of tomatoes are making Bengalureans teary-eyed. The price of tomatoes in the city is skyrocketing, selling at a whooping Rs 100 per kg. However, it’s not just tomatoes as vegetables such as carrots, beans and chilli are also witnessing cost-push inflation. 

Horticultural Producers’ Cooperative Marketing and Processing Society (HOPCOMS) in the city reported that for the past month, the prices have been severely affected. On Monday, tomatoes at HOPCOMS were fixed at Rs 125 per kg and on Tuesday, the price marginally fell to Rs 110 per kg.

Speaking to TNIE, HOPCOMS Managing Director Mirji Umesh Shankar said, “We have stopped receiving produce from Nashik in Maharashtra which has further increased the prices. The rain deficit across the country has also impacted the prices.” He added that for a couple of weeks, the prices may not come down which will put an enormous burden on consumers. 

Pradeep Gowda, a vegetable retailer in Indiranagar, complained that the price rise has left customers buying vegetables in fewer quantities. “Beans are priced at Rs 95 per kg, carrots at Rs 80 a kg and green chilli Rs 110 per kg. A month ago, these vegetables were around Rs 60-80 per kg only.”

Small restaurants and outlets bear the brunt 

Small eateries and restaurants that source their vegetables from local markets are facing the brunt of high prices and incurring a loss of 10-15 per cent on a regular basis. 

Anju Sudarshan, who runs a cafe in JP Nagar, said, “We use tomatoes in every dish; it’s a staple item for us. We can’t increase the price of our dishes so we are making losses. Hopefully, the prices will come down soon.” 

Sudarshan, who runs a cafe, sources vegetables from the local market in JP Nagar and cannot buy vegetables in bulk.

A restaurant in Baiyapanahalli, Sri Krshina Gangotri, will have to increase rates on its menu if the prices do not go down. Chandrashekar, the owner, added, “Our marginal profit has come down by at least 15-20 per cent. We have so many workers to pay and the price has increased by 50 percent. How will we sustain?”

Consumers complained that prices of essential commodities should be capped by the government to reduce burden on the common man.

 (With inputs from Chithra Prakash KV)

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