Karma transcends another language

Evidently, Sadhguru’s book is far-reaching, offering a comprehensive look into the cosmic design of karma.
 Murali M, the managing director of Sri Krishna Sweets, ‘Kalaimamani’ Marabin Maindan Muthiah, popular speaker Bharathi Bhaskar and actor and director Suhasini Maniratnam, presenting the book ' Karma-Vidhiyai Vellum Suthirangal'
Murali M, the managing director of Sri Krishna Sweets, ‘Kalaimamani’ Marabin Maindan Muthiah, popular speaker Bharathi Bhaskar and actor and director Suhasini Maniratnam, presenting the book ' Karma-Vidhiyai Vellum Suthirangal'

CHENNAI : Karma is a boomerang. What goes around comes around. You reap what you sow. Do unto others as you would have them do to you. The list goes on.

The concept of karma is not new to any of us and today, it has reached the far ends of the world. But what exactly is karma?

This is what Sadhguru delves into in his new Tamil book, Karma-Vidhiyai Vellum Suthirangal. While the English version, Karma: A Yogi’s Guide to Crafting Your Destiny was first published in 2021, having accumulated over four lakh sold copies and 15,000 Amazon reviews since then, Sadhguru felt the necessity to make it accessible to a wider Tamil readership. This prompted the book introduction meeting hosted by Isha recently at Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.

A crowd of prospective readers, Isha volunteers and admirers of Sadhguru’s work sat transfixed as the event kicked off with a seven-person music ensemble with a plethora of instruments, turning Tamil poetry into charming melodies. With that, the stage was taken over by the guests of honour, Murali M, the managing director of Sri Krishna Sweets, ‘Kalaimamani’ Marabin Maindan Muthiah, popular speaker Bharathi Bhaskar and actor and director Suhasini Maniratnam.

In his speech, Murali highlighted the misrepresentation of karma in common parlance when using the word ‘karmam’ in Tamil. “While the word has received a negative connotation and status, it is the root word of karma. Karma implies both positivity and negativity, depending on your own actions. Karma is the simple act of loving those around you without expecting anything in return.”

Following this, Suhasini took to the stage, talking about her experiences in Isha’s ashrams and with Sadhguru. She chalked up his success to how accessible his teachings are to the common man. While Bharathi has not visited the ashram or interacted with Sadhguru herself, his parables have greatly resonated with her. “The silence of the oppressor is worse than the violence of the oppressor. Karma is not only about doing wrong, it is also about indifference. The karma of not responding is equally as bad as the karma of responding the wrong way,” she shared.

Muthiah echoed this statement, establishing that karma is the divine ability to respond, according to Sadhguru. “Karma is freedom and karma is responsibility,” he said. “Both have to do with the autonomy and consequences of your own actions.” He also found a humorous way to describe the types of karma, eliciting laughter from the audience. “‘Sanchita Karma’ is the check-in luggage that you carry from your past births. ‘Prarabdha Karma’ is hand baggage allotted to you. ‘Agami Karma’ is the goods that you buy last minute at the airport!”

Evidently, Sadhguru’s book is far-reaching, offering a comprehensive look into the cosmic design of karma. It includes autobiographical sketches, stories, scenarios, and examples of how potent karma can be, while also responding to other predominant views on karma. In addition, it outlines the sutras that one can use to overcome their pre-written destiny. Sutras (meaning threads) are cheat codes of sorts, that help in one’s self-improvement and actualisation. Sadhguru has managed to simplify and condense the larger truths of the universe into a book, so taking a chance to learn about them seems to be a natural choice.

Related Stories

No stories found.

X
The New Indian Express
www.newindianexpress.com