Image for representational purpose only. ( Express Illustration)
Image for representational purpose only. ( Express Illustration)

Drug Molnupiravir effective against Omicron, could reduce deaths: Study

A new study revealed that a five-day course of antiviral drug, Molnupiravir, could be effective against highly contagious Omicron and other variants of concern (VOCs).

NEW DELHI: A new study revealed that a five-day course of antiviral drug, Molnupiravir, could be effective against highly contagious Omicron and other variants of concern (VOCs).

The study also stated that Molnupiravir may be better than monoclonal antibodies and Remedivisir.

“From the available evidence, Molnupiravir appears to be a reasonably useful drug in reducing deaths and hospitalisation in adult patients with COVID-19 having high risk, with a relatively lower cost. Molnupiravir could be a useful drug in non-pregnant unvaccinated adults with COVID-19 who are at increased risk of severity including hospitalization,” said Dr. Anoop Misra, Padma Shri, Executive Chairman and Director, Diabetes and Endocrinology, Fortis C- DOC.

The study, published in the journal, Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews, was conducted by a team of doctors at Fortis C-DOC, GD Hospital and Diabetes Institute, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College and Hospital, and the Diabetes Foundation.

It pointed out that “subgroup analysis found Molnupiravir was effective irrespective of strain although no data is available for its effect on Omicron in particular”, stated the study.

“Unlike monoclonal antibodies, the mechanism of action of Molnupiravir is independent of mutations in the spike protein, and it is expected to work against Omicron, theoretically. Indeed, in vitro study of VeroE6-GFP cells does indicate that Molnupiravir retain their activity against VOCs of Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and Omicron,” the journal added.

“However, Molnupiravir is effective only when used within five days from the onset of Omicron symptoms. Inappropriate use without assessing risk may pose an unknown long-term risk of public concern,” cautioned Dr. Misra.

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The New Indian Express
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