Delhi water crisis: Water for them is brick fights, financial burden, daily battle

With the summer intensifying, the reporters visited over five villages in the city, where the residents have been living in the crescendo of chaos and desperation.
Residents fill water from a tanker amid water crisis, at the Vivekanand Camp, Chanakyapuri area, in New Delhi
Residents fill water from a tanker amid water crisis, at the Vivekanand Camp, Chanakyapuri area, in New DelhiPhoto | PTI

NEW DELHI: In Kusumpur Pahadi’s Block E, the fight for water isn’t just a necessity; it’s a daily battle for survival. As the sun begins its descent, the atmosphere around the lone water pump thickens with tension. Residents gather, their faces etched with fatigue and desperation, knowing that securing even a trickle of water is crucial for their families’ well-being.

With the summer intensifying, the reporters visited over five villages in the city, where the residents have been living in the crescendo of chaos and desperation.

The words of Bhagwati Ghadiya from Kusumpur echo the sentiments of many: the two-hour window to access the pump is a fleeting opportunity, and failure to seize it means sacrificing the ability to perform essential tasks of the day.As the evening wears on, the struggle for water aggravates, reaching a fever pitch in the final hour. “Brick fights erupt, I’ve seen it get bloody even” Burmavati of block E stated.

Meanwhile Santosh Rajkumar from Sanjay Colony alleged the water crisis is linked to politics. “Before the election results, everything was fine. Now, daily fights over water are common. Despite complaints to the AAP office, nothing has changed,” he noted.

Another Sanjay Colony resident Sheela Devi voiced her concerns about the severe water shortage and the authorities’ lack of action in addressing the issue.“The tanker sometimes comes, but the water it brings is often dirty. This forces residents to purchase water from shops, which is an additional financial burden. We have to buy water at 25 rupees for 10 liters,” she added.

The water crisis is causing serious problems for kids as well in Nehru Nagar. They are getting rashes and skin irritation because the only water available is salty. They have to use this salt water for drinking, cooking, and bathing, which is affecting their health. Similarly Ghazipur village has also been grappling with severe water scarcity and poor water quality, exacerbating the daily struggles of its residents. The environment is filthy, with trash littering the streets and no proper drainage system in place, further contributing to the dire situation.

Pinky, a 42-year-old cosmetic shop owner, shared her frustration. “Every day, I have to spend Rs 60 on bottled water because the clean water supply is so unreliable. It only comes for an hour in the morning and another hour in the evening around 5 pm, and even then, it’s often dirty or barely a trickle.”

Amna, who owns a small shop, voiced his concerns as well. “For the past two months, we haven’t had any clean water. The water that does come is filthy. It’s been a nightmare trying to run my business and keep my family healthy,” the 50-year-old explained.

Inadequate supply of water

Several parts of Delhi have been hit by inadequate supply of water amid heatwave conditions prevailing in Delhi. Slums, resettlement colonies, and villages are the severely hit and forced to buy water tankers or depend upon DJB takers.

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