Hyderabad: PIB holds workshop on new laws, experts discuss major reforms

Shruti Patil, Additional Director General of PIB, stated that the new laws aim to make the criminal justice system more accessible, accountable, and capable of meeting contemporary challenges.
Image of a laptop used for representational purpose only.
Image of a laptop used for representational purpose only.

HYDERABAD: The Press Information Bureau (PIB) held a workshop — titled ‘Vartalap’ — in the city during which experts discussed the implications and details of India’s newly introduced criminal laws: Bharatiya Nagarik Suraksha Sanhita, Bharatiya Nyaya Sanhita and Bharatiya Sakshya Adhiniyam.

Professor Srikrishna Deva Rao, Vice-Chancellor of NALSAR University of Law, said the new laws focus on justice rather than punishment, providing victim-centric reforms. He also noted the laws’ incorporation of gender neutrality and transparency. Special provisions for crimes against women and children, as well as punishments for mob lynching and community service for minor offences, were also discussed.

Former IG of Andhra Pradesh Police, E Damodar, highlighted the use of technology in the new criminal justice process, from filing FIRs to delivering court judgments online. He explained the implementation of timelines for investigations and court proceedings to reduce delays, stating that the number of adjournments has been limited to two.

N Rajashekara, director of Central Detective Training Institute (CDTI), discussed major changes, including enhanced victim rights, especially for women and children, and the use of technology in judicial procedures. He mentioned the classification of financial scams and cybercrimes as organised crime under the BNS, which will lead to stricter penalties for such offences.

Shruti Patil, Additional Director General of PIB, stated that the new laws aim to make the criminal justice system more accessible, accountable, and capable of meeting contemporary challenges.

Key points

  • FIRs can be filed electronically or at any PS nationwide, removing jurisdictional constraints.

  • Special provisions ensure that crimes against women and children are handled with care and sensitivity, with female officers and magistrates involved in cases of rape.

  • The laws integrate technology throughout the process, from E-FIRs to electronic case documents and audio-video conferencing for court proceedings.

  • Forensic investigation is mandated for serious offences

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