YVU fungiculture prog makes growers mushroom

These initiatives target undergraduate and postgraduate students, research scholars, faculty members, as well as women from diverse backgrounds and unemployed youth.
YVU fungiculture prog makes 
growers mushroom

KADAPA: Yogi Vemana University (YVU) has taken a proactive stance in advocating for mushroom cultivation, empowering approximately 300 students through its comprehensive training programmes.

As part of its commitment to agricultural innovation and sustainable practices, the university has launched initiatives to educate students about the cultivation of mushrooms. These efforts aim to equip the next generation with the knowledge and skills needed to thrive in the agricultural sector. Under the guidance of experienced faculty members and experts in the field, students have been exposed to various aspects of mushroom cultivation, including cultivation techniques, harvesting methods, and market dynamics. Through hands-on training and practical workshops, participants have gained valuable insights into the nuances of mushroom farming. These initiatives target undergraduate and postgraduate students, research scholars, faculty members, as well as women from diverse backgrounds and unemployed youth.

YVU Bio-technology, Head of the Department, Dr P Chandramati Shankar said, “Mushroom cultivation holds significant market potential, especially in the North Eastern Region and Sikkim. The hospitality sector, comprising hotels and resorts, presents ample opportunities for mushroom producers. Government subsidies under schemes like the National Horticulture Board and the Ministry of Food Processing further encourages mushroom cultivation.”

Mushroom farming, characterised by its low investment and space requirements, has emerged as a lucrative agri-business in India. Notably, mushroom cultivation offers a sustainable solution for recycling agricultural waste, thereby reducing environmental pollution, added the Professor.

The practice has gained traction among various demographic groups, including landless farmers, unemployed youths, and housewives, contributing to rural livelihoods and economic growth. “With meticulous planning from seed generation to cultivation, harvesting, and marketing, students have gained practical knowledge at each stage of the mushroom production process,” said K Raju, a student from Chennuru mandal.

Oyster mushrooms, primarily cultivated in the North East, are known for their ease of cultivation and processing. Rich in vitamins, minerals, and protein, mushrooms offer numerous health benefits, including immune system support and anticancer properties.

The proposed cultivation unit aims to produce 2000 kgs of fresh mushrooms and 3000 kgs of dried mushrooms.

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