Where wild flowers roam

Designer Rajesh Pratap Singh’s debut collection for Satya Paul is a modern-day  homage to the flamboyant Flower Child of the Sixties.
A woman who is not just free-spirited in her heart, but embraces it in her everyday attitude as well.
A woman who is not just free-spirited in her heart, but embraces it in her everyday attitude as well.

Over the meadows in the valley where the wildflowers roam, Rajesh Pratap Singh seeks inspiration out of the city into the wild. And it’s not just any flower. It’s those big, bold, full-blown petals of the flamboyant flower power era—a time where both music and motifs were larger than life.

Rajesh Pratap Singh
Rajesh Pratap Singh

Naturally, the inspiration for the new Valley of Flowers collection came from the lifestyle icons of the late 60s and 70s, as well as the the collages of one of the most influential ‘outsider’ artists of that time, Henry Darger. “Growing up, I was fascinated with the album covers of  Bob Dylan, Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix, Robert Plant, Patti Smith and Studio 54 characters, as well as Darger’s work.

I wanted to bring back that nostalgic feeling by using seminal floral motifs, bold prints and colours to infuse the collection with a fresh interpretation for millennials who could take a trip down memory lane, and embrace their own free-spirited attitude.

After all, there are lessons for all of us in history and the world can now gain from the exuberance and innocence of that era,” says Singh, who joined as Satya Paul’s Creative Director this June.The collection that comprises ready-to-wear clothing, saris, scarves and bags, therefore, reimagines outspoken motifs reminiscent of the era into the present world.

While staying true to that period, it nevertheless, caters to the needs of the modern-day woman who is proud to wear her fearless attitude on her sleeve. A woman who is not just free-spirited in her heart, but embraces it in her everyday attitude as well.

So, there are signature print saris with 3D embroidery and handwoven interpretations, reversible kimonos, tailored suits, pleated tunics, evening capes, tie-up bow tops and dresses in floral patchwork with hand-stitch details in the Japanese Boro style—which is basically textiles that have been mended or patched together.Besides, there are silk, wool and pure cashmere scarfs with an antivirus finish. 

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The New Indian Express
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