‘40% people with bipolar disorder achieved complete mental health’

The researchers compared 555 Canadians with a history of bipolar disorder to 20,530 respondents without such a history.
‘40% people with bipolar disorder achieved complete mental health’

NEW DELHI: Over 40% of people diagnosed with bipolar disorder were free of symptoms and about a quarter achieved complete mental health, a new study has said.

One of the reasons for this turnaround was having a trusted confidant which helped the person achieve complete mental health, said the study, published in the Journal of Affective Disorders Reports.

Bipolar disorder is marked by extreme mood and energy swings and can sometimes be accompanied by hallucinations and delusions. However, the study by the University of Toronto said despite encouraging results, people with a history of mental conditions were less likely to be flourishing compared to their peers.

“The adoption of spirituality as a coping mechanism and the absence of chronic pain were also identified as strong predictors for psychological flourishing,” said co-author of the study, Ishnaa Gulati.

“Individuals with a history of bipolar disorder still face challenges in achieving complete mental health compared to those without such a diagnosis,” said author Melanie J Katz, a researcher at the University of Toronto. The researchers compared 555 Canadians with a history of bipolar disorder to 20,530 respondents without such a history.

They also had to report daily social and psychological well-being and happiness or life satisfaction. Interventions designed to foster supportive environments, strengthen social bonds, enhance coping mechanisms, and address physical health concerns, such as chronic pain, could empower individuals with bipolar disorder to navigate their path toward recovery, said authors.

The study also found a higher prevalence of complete mental health among married individuals, older respondents, those with higher income, and those with no lifetime history of drug or alcohol abuse. “We hope that those with the disorder will be heartened to learn that that one-quarter of the respondents who previously had bipolar disorder were now happy or satisfied with their life almost every day,” Esme Fuller-Thomson, professor at the University of Toronto’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work and director of the Institute for Life Course and Aging.

Related Stories

No stories found.

X
The New Indian Express
www.newindianexpress.com