STOCK MARKET BSE NSE

Where Lord Venkatesvara Swami married padmavathi

Narayanavanam is situated in Chitoor district, is home to a Vishnu temple dedicated to Kalyana Venkatesvara Svami, where, according to tradition, the sacred wedding of God Venkatesvara Svami and Goddess Padmavathi, daughter of Akasaraja took place.

Published: 08th August 2018 04:00 AM  |   Last Updated: 07th August 2018 09:51 PM   |  A+A-

CHENNAI : Narayanavanam is situated in Chitoor district, is home to a Vishnu temple dedicated to Kalyana Venkatesvara Svami, where, according to tradition, the sacred wedding of God Venkatesvara Svami and Goddess Padmavathi, daughter of Akasaraja took place. The sanctity of this temple is described in the section called Sri Venkatesa Mahatmyam, found in the ancient text, Varaha Purana. 

The principal sanctum enshrines the beautiful image of Kalyana Venkatesvara in a standing posture with consorts Sri Devi and Bhu Devi on either side. Perumal holds the sankha and the chakra in the upper hands while the lower right hand is in abhaya hasta (blessing) and lower left hand rests on the thigh. Interestingly, the deity wears a bracelet (kankana) on the wrist as Venkatesvara Svami is the divine bridegroom here.

The image is bedecked with an exquisite Dasavatara udyanam (belt) around the waist and is also seen holding a knife as Venkatesvara came to this place while on a hunting expedition. The processional deity, worshipped as Kalyana Srinivasa is flanked by Sri Devi and Bhu Devi. An image of Bhoga Srinivasa is also in worship here just as in the world famous temple at Tirumala (Tirupati). Near the principal shrine is the sanctum of Goddess Padmavathi Thayar close to which is a grinding stone believed to have been used to grind turmeric during the marriage of Srinivasa and Padmavathi. A separate sanctum for Andal is there too. 

Many Vijayanagara era inscriptions have been discovered here. An epigraph dated 1541 AD states that it was constructed in that year in the reign of the Vijayanagara Emperor Achyuta Raya by a person called Virupanna for the merit of the Emperor’s son, Prince Venkatadri. Other inscriptions mention gift of tolls by a mercantile community, donations of land and bullocks.  In 1623 AD, an entire village was donated to this temple for offerings and for conducting festivals by a provincial governor (Mahamandaleshwara).

More from Opinions.

Comments

Disclaimer : We respect your thoughts and views! But we need to be judicious while moderating your comments. All the comments will be moderated by the newindianexpress.com editorial. Abstain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks. Try to avoid outside hyperlinks inside the comment. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines.

The views expressed in comments published on newindianexpress.com are those of the comment writers alone. They do not represent the views or opinions of newindianexpress.com or its staff, nor do they represent the views or opinions of The New Indian Express Group, or any entity of, or affiliated with, The New Indian Express Group. newindianexpress.com reserves the right to take any or all comments down at any time.

IPL_2020
flipboard facebook twitter whatsapp