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Three rare bird species spotted in Andhra Pradesh's Coringa mangrove forest

The bird population in Coringa and its surrounding places increased by 12,000, compared to last year census, which enumerated 34,207 migratory birds belonging to 104 species.

Published: 21st February 2022 07:41 AM  |   Last Updated: 21st February 2022 07:41 AM   |  A+A-

A flock of the Indian skimmer, an endangered bird species

A flock of the Indian skimmer, an endangered bird species. (Photo| EPS)

Express News Service

RAJAMAHENDRAVARAM: For the first time, three rare migratory bird species have been spotted in the Coringa mangrove forest in East Godavari district. In the Asian Waterbird Census 2022 conducted by the Bombay Natural History Society and Wetlands International in January, a total of 46,546 birds belonging to 108 species were enumerated.

The bird population in Coringa and its surrounding places increased by 12,000, compared to last year census, which enumerated 34,207 migratory birds belonging to 104 species. In 2020, 26,734 birds belonging to 96 species were enumerated. After five years, the bird population in the Coringa Wildlife Sanctuary crossed the 40,000-mark. 

In 2017, 43,718 birds were enumerated in the sanctuary. The survey covered 12 places in and around Coringa and other areas of the district. Twelve teams participated in the bird census. 

Bird census covered 12 places in East Godavari

Each team consisted of four members, including a birdwatcher, a student, a scientist and a forest staffer. The bird census covered Rajamahendravaram, Coringa, Kotipalli, Godavari, Katrenikona, S Yanam, Kumbhabhishekam, Pandi, Pora, Pallam, Sacramento and Hope Islands. The census was conducted from 4 am to 12 pm everyday. 

Sharing the details of the bird census with The New Indian Express, Divisional Forest Officer (Wildlife) P Selvam and biologist D Mahesh Babu said, "A team of scientists and birdwatchers spotted the rare migratory bird species broad-billed sandpiper, crab-plover and greater flamingo in the Coringa forest for the first time. The broad-billed sandpiper species generally migrates from Siberia, Russia and Mongolia, while the crab-plover and the greater flamingo come from Oman and other Arab countries."

The census report submitted to the wildlife department of Rajamahendravaram forest circle stated that several migratory bird species like little egret, little cormorant, Pacific golden plover, lesser sand plover, black winged stilt, black tailed godwit, pallas gull, brown headed gull and caspian tern were spotted in and around Coringa. 

It is the second largest mangrove forest in India after Sunderbans in West Bengal. The mangrove forest attracts many migratory bird species.

They include seagull, flamingo, pond heron, grey heron, sandpiper, little egret, red-wattled lapwing, blue kingfisher, pied kingfisher, brahminy kite, little cormorant, reef heron, crow pheasant and black-capped kingfisher bird species, Mahesh Babu explained.



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