Karnataka: After cotton candy & kebabs, lens now on pani puri

To proactively protect consumers from potential additives, stringent measures are being planned and will be implemented in advance.
 Manufacturers and sellers must be aware that if they compromise on the quality of the food products, they will be penalised and face stringent action.
Manufacturers and sellers must be aware that if they compromise on the quality of the food products, they will be penalised and face stringent action.(File Photo | Debadatta Mallick, EPS)

BENGALURU: Following the ban on use of artificial colours in cotton candy, gobi manchurian and recently kebabs, the state health department is now likely to regulate the sale of pani puri, suspecting that carcinogenic colouring agents are mixed with the water used in the preparations.

Speaking to TNIE, officials of the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) said they have collected over 200 samples of pani puris across the state and are currently awaiting the test results.

A senior FSSAI official mentioned that the department collected the samples from various spots like wedding halls and shopping malls apart from street vendors outside malls, parks, educational institutes and offices.

Asked about the department’s next focus in the interests of public safety, the official said there is a possibility of regulating the sale of Indian sweets. “The department is actively picking up random food samples that are often consumed, and the next target could be sweets, particularly jalebi, laddu and jahangir, which are notable for their bright colour,” the official said.

As festivals are approaching, the demand for sweets typically surge. At such times, sellers usually receive substantial orders. To proactively protect consumers from potential additives, stringent measures are being planned and will be implemented in advance, the official added.

The continuous testing initiative not only aims to educate citizens about the risks associated with street food and the potential presence of harmful chemicals, but also serves as a warning to vendors and sellers to strictly adhere to food safety regulations. Manufacturers and sellers must be aware that if they compromise on the quality of the food products, they will be penalised and face stringent action as per Food Safety and Standards Act, 2006, the official highlighted.

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