Massive student failure sparks protests at Gandhi Medical College, Secunderabad

The first-year curriculum includes eight subjects, with KNRUHS conducting exams for five and the respective colleges for the remaining three.
B.Sc Allied Health students protest in front of the Gandhi Medical College in Secunderabad on Thursday after an unusually high number of  pupils failed to clear the exam
B.Sc Allied Health students protest in front of the Gandhi Medical College in Secunderabad on Thursday after an unusually high number of pupils failed to clear the examFile Photo

HYDERABAD: Protests broke out at the Gandhi Medical College on Thursday after a whopping 715 of the 740 students who took the B.Sc Allied Health Sciences first-year examination conducted by the Kaloji Narayana Rao University of Health Sciences (KNRUHS) failed to clear it.

The course, introduced in 2023, is available at nine government medical colleges in the state, with a total of 860 seats. The annual examination for the 2023-24 batch took place from April 20 to April 29 and results were announced on June 24. The students realised the unusually high percentage of failures when they compared the results.

The first-year curriculum includes eight subjects, with KNRUHS conducting exams for five and the respective colleges for the remaining three. An overwhelming number of the students failed to clear at least three of the university-conducted exams, while many failed all five.

The total score is 800, with a passing criterion of 50% in each subject. Of the 740 students who appeared for the examination, only 25 passed, according to the students. However, official figures were unavailable even on the university website. Attempts to reach KNRUHS officials, including the registrar and VC, as well as GMC principal Dr Ramesh Reddy, were unsuccessful.

Students complained of course deficiencies, saying that there was no clarity on the syllabus, lack of faculty and irregular classes. They met with Dr Ramesh Reddy, who attributed the issue to the university.

“We paid 20,000 for admission and continued the course despite challenges, hoping the university would eventually provide the necessary facilities. The failure of 700 students is beyond comprehension. We are now trying to reach the registrar and VC for answers,” a student told TNIE on condition of anonymity.

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