Hyderabad: Military College of Electronics and Mechanical Engineering displays next-gen military tech

The 105th convocation ceremony at the MCEME gave visitors a glimpse into how India’s armed forces are harnessing the power of technology to maximise its power.
Officers present a demonstration of the virtual reality-based combat medical care (VR CMC) during the 105th convocation ceremony at Military College of Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Secunderabad, on Saturday
Officers present a demonstration of the virtual reality-based combat medical care (VR CMC) during the 105th convocation ceremony at Military College of Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Secunderabad, on SaturdayPhoto | Vinay Madapu

HYDERABAD: The 105th convocation ceremony at the Military College of Electronics and Mechanical Engineering (MCEME) on Saturday gave visitors a glimpse into how India’s armed forces are harnessing the power of technology to maximise its power.

Some of the homegrown innovations that were on display included the virtual reality-based combat medical care (VR CMC), an augmented reality (AR)-based advanced mannequin system, an autonomous reconnaissance and battlefield surveillance drone and a voice-controlled robot that can also function offline, among others.

VR CMC, developed by the Army’s Simulator Development Division (SDD), aims to train medical officers in human anatomy and physiology. With the help of VR, trainee medical officers will be immersed in highly-stressful active war scenarios where only minimal medical facilities are available. Apart from offering realistic experiences, the project will reduce dependency on dead bodies or actual injured persons for practice.

The AR-based advanced mannequin system involves a life-size mannequin fitted with sensors and actuators reacting as per simulated health conditions. The mannequin system allows trainees to use mistakes as learning tools devoid of any potentially life-threatening consequences. “While the person is cut off from the real world in the VR system, they can see the real world also in AR,” said an officer from the SDD.

AK Chaturvedi, Commandant of SDD, told TNIE that while these systems were developed for defence purposes, they can be replicated in civil equipment as well. The Commandant said, “The SDD has 16 VR innovations to its credit. Even IITs cannot claim that.”

A voice-controlled robot, submitted by four officers of the graduating class, was another project that grabbed eyeballs. The robot, which works on radio frequency transmission, is equipped with a camera to provide live video transmission of 500-600 metres from the robot. “Radio frequency transmission reduces chances of interception. The robot is also capable of functioning without the internet, which is beneficial in locations with poor connection,” said Lt Harshit Dwivedi, an officer involved in the project.

Speaking about the autonomous reconnaissance and battlefield surveillance drone, Sandeep Kumar, a subedar involved in the project, said the drone offers a lot of room for improvements such as night-time enabling.

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