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China reverses ban on trade in tiger, rhino products 

Tiger bone and rhino horn are used in traditional Chinese medicine, despite a lack of evidence of their effectiveness in treating illness and the effect on wild populations.

Published: 30th October 2018 11:06 AM  |   Last Updated: 30th October 2018 11:06 AM   |  A+A-

China flag

Representational image of China flag (FIle | AP)

By PTI

BEIJING: China says it will allow trading in products made from endangered tigers and rhinos under "special circumstances," reversing a previous ban and bringing condemnation from conservation groups.

A notice from the Cabinet issued Monday avoided mentioning any change in the law, saying instead that it would "control" the trade and that rhino horns and tiger bones could only be obtained from farmed animals for use in "medical research or in healing.

"Under the special circumstances, regulation on the sales and use of these products will be strengthened, and any related actions will be authorized, and the trade volume will be strictly controlled," the statement said.

Tiger bone and rhino horn are used in traditional Chinese medicine, despite a lack of evidence of their effectiveness in treating illness and the effect on wild populations.

Chinese demand for ivory is also blamed as a driver behind the slaughter of African elephants, despite Beijing banning all trade in ivory starting from this year.

The World Wildlife Fund said the move to overturn the ban would have "devastating consequences globally" by allowing poachers and smugglers to hide behind legalized trade.

"With wild tiger and rhino populations at such low levels and facing numerous threats, legalized trade in their parts is simply too great a gamble for China to take," Margaret Kinnaird, WWF wildlife practice leader, was quoted as saying in a statement from the Washington-based organization.

"This decision seems to contradict the leadership China has shown recently in tackling the illegal wildlife trade," Kinnaird said.

Despite the former ban, China has long allowed tiger farms, which harvest the bones of dead animals, and tacitly allows their sale for alleged medicinal purposes, according to a study by the Environmental Investigation Agency, a British nonprofit.

Operators are also believed to be investigating the possibility of farming rhinos in the country, although, unlike tigers, those are not native to China.

The EIA called the overturning of the ban a "brazen and regressive move which drastically undermines international efforts for tiger and rhino conservation.

" "At a single stroke, China has shattered its reputation as a growing leader in conservation following its domestic ban on the sale of ivory at the start of the year," the group said.



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