Rare canvas by Paul Gauguin fetches USD 10.5 million at Paris auction

The 1897 painting 'Te Bourao II', which was bought by an international collector, depicts how an evocative Tahiti landscape would remain in France.

Published: 04th December 2019 01:56 PM  |   Last Updated: 04th December 2019 01:56 PM   |  A+A-

Two employees carry a painting entitled 'Te Bourao' by French painter Paul Gauguin

Two employees carry a painting entitled 'Te Bourao' by French painter Paul Gauguin (Photo| AFP)

By AFP

PARIS: A rare canvas by French artist Paul Gauguin from his time in Tahiti fetched 9.5 million euros (USD 10.5 million) in Paris on Tuesday, nearly twice its estimated value, the auction house said. The bidding had drawn keen interest amid growing controversy over Gauguin's relationships with young girls on the Polynesian island and his depictions of them.

The 1897 painting, "Te Bourao II" or "tree" in the local Tahitian language, had been expected to go for around five to seven million euros. The buyer is an "international collector", the Artcurial auction house said, adding the artwork depicting an evocative Tahiti landscape would remain in France. It is one of the few paintings from the post-impressionist's Tahiti period still in private hands. 

According to Artcurial, the last sale in France of a Gauguin from this period was 22 years ago.  Recent years have seen increasing attention on Gauguin's attitudes to the young women who feature in the paintings of this period.

An exhibition of the painter currently at the National Gallery in London said "that it aims to consider Gauguin's relationships and the impact of colonialism through the prisms of contemporary debate."

Stay up to date on all the latest World news with The New Indian Express App. Download now
(Get the news that matters from New Indian Express on WhatsApp. Click this link and hit 'Click to Subscribe'. Follow the instructions after that.)

Comments

Disclaimer : We respect your thoughts and views! But we need to be judicious while moderating your comments. All the comments will be moderated by the newindianexpress.com editorial. Abstain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks. Try to avoid outside hyperlinks inside the comment. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines.

The views expressed in comments published on newindianexpress.com are those of the comment writers alone. They do not represent the views or opinions of newindianexpress.com or its staff, nor do they represent the views or opinions of The New Indian Express Group, or any entity of, or affiliated with, The New Indian Express Group. newindianexpress.com reserves the right to take any or all comments down at any time.

flipboard facebook twitter whatsapp