Tamilchelvan Comes of Age

Set in a village near Salem, the plot centres around Kuruvi, a petty thief, the turn of events in his life, and his attempt to turn over a new leaf. Debutant director Tamilchelvan reveals a ma

Published: 15th January 2012 02:07 AM  |   Last Updated: 16th May 2012 06:15 PM   |  A+A-

TSAMIL

Set in a village near Salem, the plot centres around Kuruvi, a petty thief, the turn of events in his life, and his attempt to turn over a new leaf. Debutant director Tamilchelvan reveals a maturity and confidence in his very first work, moving his narration smoothly and adeptly.

It’s a simple straight from the heart story telling, with a thread of realism running throughout. Tamilchelvan’s script is meticulously crafted with attention to details.

Vidaarth, as the petty thief, cheerful and carefree, goes through the nuances of his character with perfect understanding. The characters are strongly etched, the actors fitting in suitably, each getting their own space. There is Kuruvi’s unmarried elder sister, irked by her brother’s irresponsible behaviour; his mentally challenged little sister Poovu (the director has extracted a splendid performance from Baby Varsha); his buddy Pandi who helped him in all his affairs and Pugazhendi from the neighbouring village who came forward to marry his sister despite knowing about his family’s financial situation. The turn in his life comes when Veni (Sanchita) enters it, their romantic encounters engagingly depicted. Sanchita (who has played Tamannah’s sister in Thillalangadi) fits in gracefully in her first lead role. The dialogue with its earthy wit and humour is a key strength to the film. The villain of the piece is Nagendran, the temple trustee (Ravishankar dramatic as usual). Plotting to usurp the temple land and wealth, he makes Kuruvi the scapegoat, the events taking an unexpected turn from here.

It’s a riveting climax at the temple festival, where the director draws an analogy to the Narasimha-Hiranya story, as Kuruvi in full fury takes on Nagendran. Kudos to the director, the stunt choreographer (T Ramesh) and the rest of the technical team for the visualization and execution of this adrenalin-pumping scene. It’s a positive ending with the promise of hope and redemption. Kollaikkaran has no superficial gloss, nor does it adopt any complicated narrative style. But its simplicity and freshness is appealing, making Kuruvi’s journey through life a moving experience.


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