Kannada film 'Inamdar' review: Delving into the complex layers of tribal life and prejudice

Director Sandesh Shetty Ajri navigates the intricate layers of tribal life and the lurking darkness of prejudice while appealing to a mass audience with intermittent action sequences.
The poster of 'Inamdar'
The poster of 'Inamdar'

Inamdar delves deep into the intricate dynamics that govern the lives of tribal communities, not only immersing you in the depths of the woods but also exposing you to the emotions and thoughts that thrive within. Director Sandesh Shetty Ajri's narrative ventures into the world of the Inamdar tribe, unfurling a captivating saga of devotion, discrimination, and despair.

The film weaves a story of two contrasting worlds. On one side, the Inamdar tribe stands firm, generations of unwavering followers of Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj. On the other side are the people who have deliberately distanced themselves from society, embracing their distinct beliefs, rituals, and an unspoiled connection with nature. It's within the dense forests at the foothills of the Western Ghats that these two worlds inevitably collide. The seeds of prejudice are sown among the ardent devotees of Lord Shiva, giving birth to a deep-rooted animosity between these two communities.

Amidst this turmoil, a child is born into the Inamdar clan. The pivotal question arises: Can this child, symbolising divinity, extinguish the flames of animosity rooted in skin colour? Is there room for a rekindling of nature's exuberance and the healing power of faith?

Director Sandesh Shetty Ajri navigates the intricate layers of tribal life and the lurking darkness of prejudice while appealing to a mass audience with intermittent action sequences. The core of the story revolves around Inamdar (MK Mata), a zamindar teetering on the brink of suicide, plagued by the fear of his lineage's extinction. A series of unfortunate events befall him, leaving him with a son, Veerabahu (Ranjan Chatrapathi), who transforms into a symbol of evil. Veerabahu's life takes a dramatic turn when he encounters Silk (Ester Noronha), an item dancer, setting the stage for a tumultuous revelation. 

The performances of the ensemble cast elicit a mixed response. Pramod Shetty, known for his varied roles, and highlighted in police officer's characters, adeptly transitions into a different role. Ester Noronha, despite her brief appearance, dazzles with her dancing skills. Thriller Manju stands out as both a stunt master and a police officer assigned to investigate the mysterious killings of his colleagues. Avinash makes a fleeting appearance, while Chirashree Anchan, the heart of the film, delivers a neat performance.

Inamdar grapples with a thought-provoking theme, delving deep into the complexities of tribal life and the shadows of prejudice. It offers perspective on the exploitation faced by tribal communities at the hands of their leaders. The story transcends the surface and delves into the multifaceted layers of human existence. However, the film is not without its shortcomings. Excessive violence and a lack of other engaging elements detract from its overall impact. A tighter screenplay could have elevated Inamdar into a more immersive and entertaining cinematic experience.

Inamdar
Director: Sandesh Shetty Ajri
Cast: Ranjan Chatrapati , Sandesh Shetty, MK Mata, Ester Noronha, Thriller Manju and Chirashree Anchan.
Rating: 2.5/5

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