Roma Narsinghani’s new line of eco-brass jewellery is an exploration of her cultural identity

Roma Narsinghani’s new line of eco-brass jewellery is an exploration of her cultural identity

The philosophy is demonstrated best in her new collection Lola & Koki, named after the two types of Sindhi rotis, which she uses as metaphors.

In jewellery designer Roma Narsinghani’s world, seemingly disparate elements—food, architecture and resilience—are woven together by a singular thread of inspiration—her Sindhi roots. The philosophy is demonstrated best in her new collection Lola & Koki, named after the two types of Sindhi rotis, which she uses as metaphors; Lola being the sweet roti and Koki the salty one. “The community’s enduring resilience, shaped by centuries of adversity, is captured in the bold and enduring forms that symbolise the strength and fortitude of its people. Sindhi architecture is characterised by a distinctive blend of Islamic, Mughal and indigenous influences, resulting in unique, ornate structures. This heritage has inspired the intricate detailing and geometric motifs in the collection,” says the 39-year-old designer.

To the world, it may look like just another new line of jewellery, but for Narsinghani, it’s a personal journey of reconnecting with her roots; one that’s closely tied to her quest for self-discovery. This is why she took her sweet time developing the eco brass line, embellished with bio-material algae beads, created in collaboration with material designer Aradhita Parasampuria.

The pieces brim with history and intrigue, drawing inspiration from stories of familial challenges, struggles and triumphs passed down through generations. She recalls listening to the animated tales of the Gulf War from her parents and stories of India’s Partition from her grandparents. “These sparked my imagination, and instilled in me an appreciation for the value of unity they carried even in the dark times; these intangible stories have been woven throughout the collection using shapes such as a rising heart for courage, falcon for freedom and the ability to navigate life’s challenges. There are also geometric motifs, symbolic of the ups and downs of one’s life, inspired by the vibrant colours and intricate patterns of the traditional Sindhi topi (cap) gifted to the designer by her mother. “The moon, for instance, represents the Cheti Chand festival that marks the arrival of spring and the start of the new year for Sindhi Hindus,” says Narsinghani, who predominantly uses eco brass made from recycled materials to craft her jewellery. “Not only does it have a lower carbon footprint, it can be repurposed easily, thus, minimising waste. From a design perspective, eco brass offers the same durability and aesthetic appeal as traditional brass,” she says.

While jewellery making remains her foremost passion, cultivating relationships outside of work brings her immense joy. Besides being a wellspring of inspiration, anytime she needs support, or someone to bounce ideas off, her family, friends and relatives are always there. After all, most of the ideas for her designs emerge through these connections.

Availability: Romanarsinghani.com

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